jump to navigation

Publishing and Synchronizing Excel 2007 Tables to SharePoint Lists July 31, 2009

Posted by John Ruby in Sharepoint.
add a comment
Advertisements

Excel 2007 Add-in: Synchronizing Tables with SharePoint Lists July 31, 2009

Posted by John Ruby in Downloads Links.
add a comment

TCP/IP Subnetting: Creating the 8-bit Subnetting Table for Class A, B, and C Networks July 31, 2009

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions.
add a comment
TCP/IP Subnetting: Creating the 8-bit Subnetting Table for Class A, B, and C Networks
Archived content. No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

Archived content – No warranty is made as to technical accuracy. Content may contain URLs that were valid when originally published, but now link to sites or pages that no longer exist.

Editor’s Note This article was written by TechNet subscriber Phil Calderone. It explains how to derive the 8-bit subnet tables found on page 95 of the Microsoft Official Curriculum course "Internetworking with Microsoft TCP/IP on Windows NT 4.0" without having to use a scientific calculator. For more in-depth, comprehensive information about subnetting, we highly recommend Introduction to TCP/IP http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windows2000serv/reskit/cnet/corenetwork.asp.

If you have ever taken a TCP/IP or IIS class, you know how difficult building your first subnet table was. First you had to have a scientific calculator. Then you had to do the "2 to the power of 2" thing, plus all the binary-to-decimal equations. Then you had to list all possible bit combinations for the subnet mask, and then convert them to decimal format to determine the beginning value of each subnet.

Well, here’s an easier way. Throw away your scientific calculator.

If you have any knowledge of the table, or at least have built one, you will immediately understand the benefits of this method. However, if you have never built a table before, you should find this pretty straightforward.

You will have to remember a few numbers; the more you remember, the easier it will be. We must remember that the default subnet mask is 255, and the highest number of subnets we can have in the first valid subnet mask is 2. We need to remember that in the Class C host, the last two subnets are invalid. Last, we need to know that there are 4 octets of 8 bits each, and the decimal equivalent for the 8 bits is 128-64-32-16-8-4-2-1. We will use simple math — multiplication, addition, and subtraction — to build our table. First, let’s do some review.

Example of a Subnet Mask

11111111

11111111

11111111

11111111

Binary

255

255

255

255

Decimal

1st octet

2nd octet

3rd octet

4th octet

Octets

4 octets separated by periods, each octet with 8 binary numbers.

An octet breaks down like this: 11111111. To convert it to a decimal, you must work from right to left, so the first number in the octet from the right is equal to 1, the second is 2, the third is 4, the fourth is 8, the fifth is 16, the sixth is 32, the seventh is 64, and the eighth, the one on the far left, is 128. So you will have 128-64-32-16-8-4-2-1 as the decimal equivalent to an octet. If you were to add all these numbers together, they would equal 255.

To begin, get two sheets of paper, including one for practice. (I recommend that you do not use a calculator. It will really help you to do the math on your scratch paper.) After you try this method a couple of times, one piece of paper will suffice.

Set up 6 columns with 8 rows (example below).

Beginning Range of Network IDs for Subnets

Subnet mask

# of Subnets

# of hosts per subnet Class – C

# of hosts per subnet Class – B

# of hosts per subnet Class – A

128–Invalid

Invalid

Invalid

Invalid

Invalid

Invalid

64

 

2

 

 

 

32

 

 

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

Invalid

 

 

1

.255

 

Invalid

 

 

  • Row 1 in all columns is invalid, so mark it out.

  • Take one octet’s decimal numbers, 128-64-32-16-8-4-2-1, and place them in the first column from high to low. This will now be our beginning range of network IDs for the subnets.

  • Take the highest subnet mask number (.255) and place it at the bottom of the subnet mask column.

  • Take the first subnet value, 2, and place it in our first valid subnet location.

  • In the Class C column, rows 7 and 8 are invalid. Mark them as such.

We’re finished with the hard part; the rest is simple math.

Let’s begin with the first two columns. To figure the subnet mask, take the number from the range column (column 1), and subtract it from the number in the subnet mask column (column 2). Place the answer in the next row above, and continue until all rows in the subnet mask column are filled.

Example:

255

1= 254, 254

2=252, 252

4= 248, 248

8=240, 240

16= 224, 224

32= 192

Beginning Range of Network IDs for Subnets

Subnet mask

Math from above Example

128– Invalid

Invalid

 

64

.192

 

32

.224

224 – 32 = 192

16

.240

240 – 16 = 224

8

.248

248 – 8 = 240

4

.252

252 – 4 = 248

2

.254

254 – 2 = 252

1

.255

255 – 1 = 254 carry up

You have just figured out your subnet mask.

Now let’s work with column 3, the number of subnets per subnet mask. From our chart, we know that we have 2 subnets next to subnet mask (.192), so that’s where we start. Take the number of subnets times 2, plus 2, and put that answer in the next row down under subnets. Continue until all rows are filled.

Example:

2×2=4+2=6

6×2=12+2=14

14×2=28+2=30

30×2=60+2=62

62×2=124+2=126

126X2=252+2=254

# of Subnets

Math from above example

Invalid

Invalid

2

(2×2) +2 = 6 carry down

6

(6×2) +2 = 14

14

(14×2) +2 = 30

30

(30×2) +2 = 62

62

(62×2) +2 = 126

126

(126×2) +2 = 254

254

 

You have just figured out the number of subnets per subnet mask.

Your table should look like this.

Beginning Range of Network IDs for Subnets

Subnets Mask

# of Subnets

# of hosts per subnet Class – C

# of hosts per subnet Class – B

# of hosts per subnet Class – A

128 — Invalid

Invalid

Invalid

Invalid

Invalid

Invalid

64

.192

2

 

 

 

32

.224

6

 

 

 

16

.240

14

 

 

 

8

.248

30

 

 

 

4

.252

62

 

 

 

2

.254

126

Invalid

 

 

1

.255

254

Invalid

 

 

Now we know the number of subnets we can have per subnet mask, and the starting range of that subnet.

For example, if I have a Class B address with anywhere from 7 to 14 subnets needed, I know I must use 255.255.240.0 as my subnet mask. I also know my range for subnets will begin at 16, and jump by 16’s (see example).

Subnet

Beginning value

Ending value

Subnet 1

w.x.16.1

w.x.31.254

Subnet 2

w.x.32.1

w.x.47.254

Subnet 3

w.x.48.1

w.x.63.254

And so on. You would go by 16’s until all 14 subnets are set up.

Subnet 14

w.x.224.1

w.x.239.254

To figure out the number of hosts per subnet for Class C addresses, take the number of subnets in column 3 on your table, and turn them upside down. List them in the valid areas of Class C. Start at the bottom-most valid area and go up.

Example:

# of hosts per subnet Class – C

Invalid

62

30

14

6

2

Invalid

Invalid

That’s the number of hosts per subnet in Class C.

Now to go to Class B.

We take 62 (the highest number of hosts we can have in Class C) and multiply it by 4, (the total number of octets). Then add 6 (the total number of ranges open above the range we are figuring). This gives us the smallest number of hosts per subnet for a Class B address.

Example: 62 x 4 = 248 + 6 = 254, so 254 is the smallest number we can have in a Class B address.

Put that number at the bottom of your Class B Table. To move up the table from there, we will take that number times 2, and add 2 to get to the next range.

254 x 2 = 508 + 2 = 510

510 x 2 = 1020 + 2 = 1022
1022 x 2 = 2044 + 2 = 4094
4094 x 2 = 8188 + 2 = 8190
8190 x 2 = 16,380 + 2 = 16,382

# of hosts per subnet Class – B

Invalid

 

16,382

(16382 x 4) + 6 = 65,534 (start of Class A)

8190

(8190 x 2) + 2 = 6,382

4094

(4094 x 2) + 2 = 8,190

2046

(2046 x 2) + 2 = 4,094

1022

(1022×2) + 2 = 2,046

510

(510×2) + 2 = 1,022

254

(254×2) + 2 = 510

That’s Class B hosts per subnet.

Now we move to Class A.

Take 16,382 x 4 + 6 = 65,534. This is the starting host for Class A, and we go back to the times-2-plus-2 formula.

# of hosts per subnet Class – A

Invalid

 

4,194,302

 

2,097,150

(2,097,150 x 2) + 2 = 4,194,302

1,048,574

(1,048,574 x 2) + 2 = 2,097,150

524,286

(524,286 x 2) + 2 = 1,048,574

262,142

(262,142 x 2) + 2 = 524,286

131,070

(131,070 x 2)+2 = 262,142

65,534

(65,534 x 2) + 2 = 131,070

Now your subnet mask table should look like this.

Beginning Range of Network ID’s for Subnets

Subnets Mask

# of Subnets

# of hosts per subnet Class – C

# of hosts per subnet Class – B

# of hosts per subnet Class – A

128 — Invalid

Invalid

Invalid

Invalid

Invalid

Invalid

64

.192

2

62

16,382

4,194,302

32

.224

6

30

8,190

2,097,150

16

.240

14

14

4,094

1,048,574

8

.248

30

6

2,046

524,286

4

.252

62

2

1,022

262,142

2

.254

126

Invalid

510

131,070

1

.255

254

Invalid

254

65,534

In a nutshell:

Take one octet and list its decimal numbers down in order. Make the top row of each column invalid and make the bottom 2 rows of Class C column invalid. Insert .255 at the bottom of the subnet mask column. Insert 2 at the top of the number of subnets column at the first valid spot.

To figure out the subnet mask column, subtract the number in the range column from the number in the subnet mask column. This will give you the next subnet mask number. Then you subtract the number in the range column on its same line from that number to get the next subnet mask number, and so on.

To figure out the number of subnets, multiply the starting number (2) by 2 and add 2 to get the next subnet number. Then multiply that number by 2 and add 2 to get the next subnet number. And so on.

To get the number of hosts, invert the subnet table onto the Class C column starting at the bottom from low to high in the first valid location.

To jump to Class B, take the highest host number (62) from Class C and multiply it times 4 (the number of octets). Then add 6 (the number of open ranges above the number you’re on): 62 x 4 = 248 + 6 = 254. Take that number and put it at the bottom of Class B, the smallest number of hosts. To move up the table in Class B, take the number times 2. Add 2 to get the next higher number, and so on until you reach the top.

To jump to Class A, take the highest number from Class B times 4 and add 6. This will give you the bottom of Class A: 16,382 x 4 = 65,528 + 6 = 65,534. Then multiply that number times 2, add 2 to move up the table, then the next number times 2, and add 2 for the next number, and so on.http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc751236.aspx

 
 

Pairing Motorola H300 July 31, 2009

Posted by John Ruby in SmartPhones.
add a comment

1.) Press and Hold Power Button for 6-10 sec till light is solid
2.) Begin Pair Search process on cell
3.) Enter 0000 as pairing code
4.) Finishing process on phone

How to pair or connect the Plantronics 510 Bluetooth headset to your Bluetooth phone July 31, 2009

Posted by John Ruby in SmartPhones.
add a comment
http://www.headsetsdirect.com/plantronics/510_pairing.html
 

1) Turn on Bluetooth within your phone – Consult phone instruction booklet

2) Put phone into pairing mode – Consult phone instruction booklet

3) Put headset into pairing mode – With headset on, press and hold call button and
     the volume up simultaneously until the headset begins to flash red and blue. 

4) Select "Add new device" on your phone.  

5) Select the Plantronics headset when prompted.  Enter "0000" as passcode.

6) Your 510 headset will now have a continuous blue light blinking.

7) Choose "Yes" if your phones asks if you want to bond to the 510 headset.

8) Your phone is now paired with the Plantronics 510 headset and ready for use

Import Into Sharepoint List July 29, 2009

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions.
add a comment
http://www.eggheadcafe.com/conversation.aspx?messageid=30014413&threadid=30014345
 
You can use Access 2003 by doing the following:
1. Link the existing SharePoint list to an Access mdb file
2. import the data from Excel into an empty access table (you may be able to
skip this step and link directly to the sheet in the workbook, but i’ve run
into problems creating action queries from linked tables to linked tables
that were solved by importing into an actual Access table)
3. create an Append query that pulls the data from the access table into the
SharePoint list
4. run the append query

Accessing Sharepoint on Windows Mobile July 27, 2009

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions.
add a comment

http://blogs.technet.com/vik/archive/2007/06/12/accessing-sharepoint-on-windows-mobile.aspx

The need for accessing Sharepoint on Windows Mobile is becoming a huge ask and this week I’m going to take some time on the various ways you can get to your Sharepoint sites via Windows Mobile

1. Using new features in Exchange 2007 with Windows Mobile 6

What you need:

  • Exchange 2007 both CAS server and Mailbox Server
  • Windows Mobile 6
  • Sharepoint 2003 or 2007

You now have the option to publish Sharepoint Sites via  the new Exchange 2007 CAS server.  You can now send a user a link to a sharepoint document or UNC link in an email and the user will be able to click on it.  Instead of opening the link in Internet Explorer it will instead go to the Published Server and grab the document via Activesync and download it to the device.  Eg.  If you get a link in an email to http://sharepoint/teamsite/document/windowsmobile.doc  you can just click on it and it will open on your device in pocket word. 

Limitations
You only have access to documents that are sent as links in email, you cannot browse shares or sites. 

2. Using the new features in MOSS 2007

What you need:

  • No Exchange Dependency
  • Windows Mobile 5 or 6
  • Sharepoint 2007

With MOSS 2007 you now have the ability to view any site via a WAP browser. If you publish your Sharepoint site to the Internet via SSL (port 443) you can securely access it from any location, but the problem in the past has been that the site would not render well on a mobile browser.  MOSS 2007 will now render that same site for a Mobile Device.  Eg. If you’d normally go to: http://www.company.com/sharepoint/teamsite/  you can just add a "m/" at the end to render it for mobile viewing: http://www.company.com/sharepoint/teamsite/m/.

Once you do this you will get a mobile view of the same site. 

Limitations
This view is limited as all Webparts will not be rendered.

3. Using Outlook 2007 and RSS feeds (Offline Access)

What you need:

  • Exchange 2003 or Exchange 2007
  • Windows Mobile 5 or 6
  • Sharepoint 2003 or 2007
  • Outlook 2007 on the Desktop

With Outlook 2007 you now have the ability to subscribe to RSS feeds.  In addition Sharepoint allows for subscriptions via RSS feeds.  If you have a system sitting on your corporate system running Outlook 2007 and you setup RSS feeds you can then subscribe to any Sharepoint feed in your environment.  Outlook will then sync the RSS folders to your Exchange server and you can then use "Managed Folders" on your windows mobile device to view the contents of the sync’ d RSS folder while you are on the go. 

Outlook Connector 12.1 supports Windows Live Calendar sync July 27, 2009

Posted by John Ruby in Utilities.
add a comment
Following the recent update to Windows Live Calendar beta, the software giant has released a new version of the Microsoft Office Outlook Connector that adds support for it. Multiple calendars from Windows Live Calendar can now be synced up with Outlook 2003 or Outlook 2007 (see Calendar tab), from where they can then be used for organization. After installing the version 12.1 beta, which is available as a 4.4MB download on the Microsoft Download Center, all the user has to do is sign in with their Windows Live ID.

Outlook Calendar has the following feature list:

  • Read and send your Office Live Mail/Windows Live Hotmail e-mail messages.
  • Manage your contacts in Windows Live Hotmail.
  • Use advanced options for blocking junk e-mail messages.
  • Manage multiple e-mail accounts in one place.
  • Manage, and synchronize multiple calendars, including shared calendars to Windows Live Calendar from Outlook.

Image courtesy of LiveSide

MSN Premium subscribers should be aware that the Outlook Connector will automatically upgrade your MSN Calendar to the new Windows Live Calendar beta and access to MSN Calendar will be denied. LiveSide is, however, reporting that while older versions of the connector allowed calendar sync only for MSN Premium subscribers, this version gives everyone the functionality.

Play RealPlayer (.rm) in Windows Media Player (WMP) July 26, 2009

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions.
add a comment
http://www.astahost.com/info.php/Play-Rm-Files-Media-Player_t7109.html
 
How to play Real audio and video files (*.rm) with Windows Media player!?
Because of competition between Microsoft and Real Networks, Windows Media Player does not support Real audio and video files, and real networks does not release any patch for WMP. But, Real has released a patch for other media players.
Now, I want learn you, how you can use this patch to play Real audio and video files.
You should have Windows Media Player and Real Player:
1- First go to sourceforge.net website and download RealMedia Splitter from guliverkli Project. to download directly go to:
http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.p…ackage_id=87719
2- Extract zipped file and copy it to your system directory:
Win9x: c:\windows\system
WinXP: c:\windows\system32
3-Click Start > Run > and type “regsvr32 realmediasplitter.ax” and then click Ok.
4-Run your Windows Media Player, select “any file(*.*)” from file type field and open a *.rm file, Windows Media Player will display an error message that the selected file has an extension that is not recognized by Windows Media Player. Select check box and press ok.
Now enjoy whit your Windows Media Player!?

To add *.rm extension to your WMP file type field :
Run Registry Editor and find following key :
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MediaPlayer\Player\Extensions\Types
Double click on “1” and add *.rm to value data field.

 
 

Play Quicktime (.mov) in Window Media Player (WMP) July 26, 2009

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions.
add a comment
More Info to follow soon, supported in WMP 12