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Cisco Physical Security and Building Systems – Main Page – Cisco Systems January 31, 2010

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Physical Security and Building Systems – Main Page – Cisco Systems
Physical Security and Building Systems

Secure, Sustainable Environment

Extend the Network as the Platform to create a secure and sustainable environment. Protect people and assets and provide energy management for buildings and the community.

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Cisco Small Business PVC300 Pan Tilt Optical Zoom Internet Camera  [Cisco Small Business Video Surve January 31, 2010

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Cisco Small Business PVC300 Pan Tilt Optical Zoom Internet Camera  [Cisco Small Business Video Surve
Cisco Small Business PVC300 Pan Tilt Optical Zoom Internet Camera

The Cisco Small Business PVC300 Pan Tilt Optical Zoom Internet Camera

The Cisco® Small Business PVC300 Pan Tilt Optical Zoom Internet Camera provides a feature-rich, highly flexible video solution for your business. It provides full pan, tilt, and optical zoom capabilities (Figure 1) to let you monitor any aspect of your business operations and virtually manage multiple sites from a central location. As an intelligent IP solution, the Cisco PVC300 also offers a wealth of advanced security, monitoring, and alerting capabilities that go far beyond what conventional closed-circuit television (CCTV) systems can provide. The Cisco Small Business PVC300 Internet camera lets you:

• Integrate alarms, door sensors, motion detectors, and other business and security systems into your video solution

• View live video of your business from anywhere, using an Internet-enabled PC or mobile phone

• Receive automatic alerts (including video clips or still images) whenever motion is detected on your premises after hours

• Locate specific dates, times, or incidents in your video archives in seconds, instead of having to manually pore over hours of analog video

• Easily and cost-effectively add new cameras, video storage, and security applications as your business evolves

None of these capabilities are possible with conventional CCTV systems that rely on analog video technology and proprietary, self-contained networks. The Cisco PVC300 Internet camera delivers all of them over the IP network you already have in place. With complete video monitoring and management software included, the Cisco PVC300 provides a complete state-of-the-art video solution, at a price small businesses can afford.

Features and Benefits

The Cisco Small Business PVC300 Pan Tilt Optical Zoom Internet Camera provides:

Optimal camera control: The Cisco PVC300 features 2.6x optical zoom and a Sony progressive-scan charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor that provides exceptional image quality even in low light. With full pan, tilt, and zoom capabilities, you can remotely monitor your business from virtually any angle, providing a cost-effective alternative to deploying multiple fixed cameras.

Remote accessibility: With an IP surveillance solution, you can access real-time video from any Internet-connected PC or mobile phone, and virtually manage your business’s security and operational efficiency from anywhere.

Advanced application support: The Cisco PVC300 features an integrated speaker output and microphone for two-way audio, as well as input/output ports to support a variety of applications. You can link your PVC300 video surveillance system with door sensors, motion sensors, alarms, lighting systems, phone systems, or virtually any other business system.

Easy installation: The Cisco PVC300 includes easy-to-install ceiling brackets and Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) support, so you can power and control the camera with a single cable. The intuitive graphical user interface in the included video software makes it easy to deploy cameras and sensor systems and set up intelligent alerts.

Included video monitoring software: Other IP surveillance systems require separate video monitoring software that can cost as much as $1500. The Cisco PVC300 includes a complete monitoring suite at no extra cost that lets you easily configure and control up to 16 cameras.

A complete surveillance solution: The Cisco PVC300 is part of a growing family of IP surveillance cameras designed as a fully integrated component of your Cisco Small Business network. With a full portfolio of small business routing and switching, data storage, and telephony technologies, Cisco can provide a comprehensive video, voice, and data solution for your business.

 

Pan, tilt, zoom camera with 2.6x optical zoom

• IPv6 support, Samba client

• 1/4-inch, progressive-scan CCD sensor delivers high-quality video

• Low light sensitivity with high-quality lens and sensor

• Audio input/output for external microphone and/or speaker

• I/O ports facilitate alarm triggers, power lights on/off, etc.

• PoE allows for flexible installation

• Dual codecs (MPEG-4 and MJPEG) supported simultaneously

• IP multicast support

• Real-Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) video/audio streaming to unicast and multicast clients

• 4x digital zoom and 2.6x optical zoom

• Third-Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) allows viewing of video on a mobile device

• Motion detection with event notifications to an email

• Account or alarm log in the monitoring software

• JPEG snapshots at multiple resolutions that can be sent to an FTP server

• Real-Time video recording from the Web interface directly with one button recording

• PC-less event recording directly to Network Attached Storage via integrated Samba client

Specifications

Standards

IEEE 802.3, IEEE 802.3af, IEEE 802.3u, IEEE 802.1p (QoS priority), IEEE 802.1Q (VLAN)

Protocols supported

TCP/IP, HTTP, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP), FTP, Network Time Protocol (NTP), Domain Name System (DNS), Universal Plug and Play (UPnP), Real-Time Protocol (RTP), Real-Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP), Dynamic DNS (DDNS), dual-stack IPv4 and IPv6, Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), Bonjour

Ports

Ethernet w/PoE, Microphone IN, Speaker OUT, Power (12V, 1A), general-purpose I/O

Buttons

Reset

Cabling type

Unshielded twisted pair (UTP) Category 5

LEDs

Power, Network

Camera type

Pan, tilt, zoom with 2.6x optical zoom

I/O ports

1 input control (2 pins) and 1 output control (2 pins)

Lens

Sensor

1/4-in. Sony progressive CCD sensor

Illumination

1 lux at F1.9

Lens type

2.8 to 7.3-mm fixed iris

Focal length

0.6 m ~ infinity

Pan

-175 to +175 degrees

Tilt

-35 to 90 degrees

Zoom

2.6x optical zoom

Field of view

Horizontal: 73.4 to 28.7 degrees; vertical: 54.7 to 21.6 degrees

Video resolution

640 x 480 (Video Graphics Array [VGA]), 320 x 240 (Quarter VGA [QVGA]), 160 x 120 (Quarter-QVGA [QQVGA])

Frame rate

1 to 30 frames per second (fps) (selectable)

Setup, Configuration, and Management

Web user interface

Built-in web user interface for easy browser-based configuration (HTTP)

Web browser

Internet Explorer version 5 or later with ActiveX support for viewing, recording, playback, and setting motion detection. Limited support for Safari and Firefox (no motion detection).

Event logging

Syslog

Web firmware upgrade

Firmware upgradable through web browser

Installation Wizard

Windows application for discovery and configuration of cameras

Video

Dual codec

MPEG-4 simple profile, MJPEG, and simultaneous dual-stream

Snapshot

JPEG

Modulation

NTSC and PAL

Image settings

Brightness, Auto White Balance, Hue, and Saturation

Zoom

4x digital zoom

Video controls

Auto white-balance (AWB), auto-exposure (AE), Auto-Focus (AF)

Image control

Select video by quality, bandwidth, frame rate, variable bit rate, and constant bit rate

Format

3GPP for use with 3G phones

Included Video Monitoring System Software (SWVMS16)

Monitoring/recording software

• Monitoring, recording, and playback for up to 16 cameras

• Advanced search histogram or by time and date

• Recording set up to record by motion trigger, manual, or schedule

Audio

Summary

• 2-way audio, built-in microphone: 6 mm, -40 db + 3 db

• Microphone input: 3.5-mm phone jack

• Speaker output: 3.5-mm phone jack

Compression

G.726: 16 Kb; G.711: A-law and μ-law AAC, and GSM-AMR

Sampling rate

8 kHz

Default bit rate

16 Kbps

Alerts

Motion detection

4 detection areas with individual sensitivity

Email alert

3 email addresses

FTP uploading

FTP server address and login settings

Schedule

Schedule by day or time

Triggers

Inputs 1, motion detection

Actions

Outputs 1, messaging, email, FTP

Security

User list

User rights list to view video and/or control camera functions; Multi-level permissions (Administrator, Operator, and Viewer)

Username/password

Login authentication

Network

Bonjour

Allow auto-discovery of the camera by other Bonjour devices

RTP/RTSP

RTP and RTSP allow for viewing from any client that supports these protocols, such as 3G phones or QuickTime clients

NTP

NTP keeps time of camera in sync with your network

SMTP

SMTP client allows video clips to be emailed

FTP

FTP client facilitates scheduling transfer of images to an FTP server

DDNS

DDNS facilitates accessing the camera by name, regardless of the camera’s IP address

UPnP

Allows auto-discovery of the camera by other UPnP devices

IP filtering

Allow or disallow access by IP address

IPv6

Allow for next-generation IP addressing

Samba client

Increased compatibility with NetBIOS over TCP/IP, SMB, CIFS, etc.

Power

Power options

IEEE 802.3af PoE: 48V/0.3A

Power consumption

7.2W

Environmental

Dimensions

5.65 x 6.19 x 5.47 in. (143.5 x 157.1 x 139 mm)

Weight

1.15 lb (0.68 kg)

Power

External power adapter 12 V DC 1A 110~120V AC/ 60 Hz switching or PoE 48V/0.3A

Certification

FCC Part 15C Class B, CE, UL, EMC/EMI Part 15B Class B for U.S.

Operating temperature

0° to 115°F (0° to 50°C)

Storage temperature

-2° to 130°F (-10° to 60°C)

Operating humidity

20% to 85%, noncondensing

Storage humidity

0% to 90%, noncondensing

Cisco WVC210 Wireless-G Pan Tilt Zoom (PTZ) Internet Video Camera: 2-Way Audio  [Cisco Small Busines January 31, 2010

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Cisco WVC210 Wireless-G Pan Tilt Zoom (PTZ) Internet Video Camera: 2-Way Audio  [Cisco Small Busines
Cisco WVC210 Wireless-G Pan Tilt Zoom (PTZ) Internet Video Camera: 2-Way Audio

High-Quality, Flexible, Remote-Controlled Wireless Video Solution for Your Small Business

Highlights

• High-quality remote-controlled wireless video camera

• Captures images even in low-light environments (1 lux at f2.0)

• Simultaneous dual codecs provide optimal combination of viewing and storage of video

• Supports two-way audio, IP multicast, 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Project), and more advanced features

Product Overview

Cisco® Small Business Video Surveillance products provide customizable ways for small business owners to monitor and protect their companies. These high-quality solutions can be optimized for many different applications and sites.

The Cisco WVC210 Wireless-G PTZ Internet Video Camera (Figure 1) sends live video through the Internet to a web browser anywhere in the world. The camera supports dual codecs (MPEG-4 and MJPEG), which can be used simultaneously. MPEG-4 gives efficient bandwidth consumption with good-quality compression and is optimal for real-time viewing of video. MJPEG gives optimal video quality, making it ideal for large-volume storage to a network attached storage (NAS) device.

The Cisco WVC210’s audio capabilities include two-way audio, an embedded microphone, external speaker and microphone ports, and voice compression. With extensive support for features such as IP multicast, Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP), Real Time Protocol (RTP), and 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), it enables video to be viewed from multiple endpoints and client applications, such as 3G phones and QuickTime clients on PCs or Wi-Fi phones. Network protocols such as 802.1p priority, 802.1Q VLANs, and Dynamic DNS (DDNS) are also supported. The WVC210 can also be managed securely using HTTPS.

The pan/tilt and digital zoom functions allow you to remotely control the camera movement and focus, giving you maximum remote flexibility. Up to 10 simultaneous unicast users can access the camera at any time. Video monitoring software is included for monitoring multiple cameras and recording to your hard drive, with advanced search by time and date. Recording can be set up to start by motion trigger or by manual or scheduled recording. Playback is available on Windows Media Player, with no need for a proprietary player.

You can also enable security mode, which tells the camera to send a message with a short attached video to up to three email addresses whenever it detects motion in its field of view. You can then log in to the live video stream if the situation warrants. Wireless security features include Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP), Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA), and WPA2.

Features

• Pan, tilt, and 2x digital zoom

• Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor with glass lens

• Dual codecs (MPEG-4 and MJPEG) supported simultaneously

• Captures video and two-way audio (with built-in microphone and external speaker) to your hard drive

• Built-in web server for remote access over IP

• Supports Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) for easy discovery on the network

• DDNS support for available free DDNS services

• Supports up to 10 simultaneous unicast users

• Motion detection with event notification to an email account or alarm log in the monitoring software

• LCD screen displays full IP address for easy configuration

• Includes software for monitoring, recording, and playback of up to 16 cameras

• Captures JPEG snapshots at multiple resolutions; snapshots can be sent to an FTP server

• IP multicast – supports unlimited multicast users

• Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) video and audio streaming to unicast and multicast clients

• 3GPP allows viewing of video on a 3G mobile device

• Real-Time video recording from the Web interface directly with one button recording

• PC-less event recording directly to Network Attached Storage via integrated Samba client

Google cyber attack highlights threat of malware – San Jose Mercury News January 19, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in News and politics.
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Google cyber attack highlights threat of malware – San Jose Mercury News
Google cyber attack highlights threat of malware

Rather than the relatively simple viruses that once bedeviled computer networks, malicious software has evolved into a sophisticated and potent weapon for corporate espionage, security experts say, so deceptive that even an organization as technologically savvy as Google was vulnerable.

Over the past 18 months, data security experts say they have seen a rapid growth in attacks by malware capable of worming its way through a computer network, lurking undetected as it searches out specific, valuable information that it can then broadcasts back to its creator

FCC Proposes Applying Net Neutrality to Carriers’ Wireless Networks January 14, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in News and politics.
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FCC Proposes Applying Net Neutrality to Carriers’ Wireless Networks
Today, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowsk said that wireless carriers shouldn’t be allowed to block certain types of Internet traffic flowing over their networks. This has huge implications for the VoIP industry, since as I wrote last week, AT&T blocks port 5060 (SIP) on their 3G data network, thus blocking VoIP applications. If the FCC mandates that the wireless carriers can no longer block applications on their data network, this opens up the entire 3G/4G wireless network to game-changing VoIP applications!

This will no doubt cause a firestorm of protests from the wireless industry which has invested billions in their wireless infrastructure and they see VoIP as something that will cannibalize their revenue stream. According to Yahoo, "FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said wireless carriers should be subject to the same "open Internet" rules that the agency has begun to apply to home broadband providers."

How to create a Windows Server 2008 Cluster within Hyper-V using simulated iSCSI stora January 11, 2010

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PFE Ireland : How to create a Windows Server 2008 Cluster within Hyper-V using simulated iSCSI stora
How to create a Windows Server 2008 Cluster within Hyper-V using simulated iSCSI storage

Familiar with Virtual Server 2005 and shared disks for creating virtual clusters?  Well its different with Hyper-V.  The shared disk option is no longer available (which I did not know when I started testing).  You have to use iSCSI instead.  Here is a step by step method for creating a fail-over cluster within Hyper-V.  Its a cheap way of setting up a test lab (assuming you don’t have access to Windows Storage server).  In this post I use StarWind to simulate iSCSI storage … its not an endorsement of the product, I just picked it from amongst the crowd.

Windows Server 2008 fail-over clusters support Serial Attached SCSI (SAS), iSCSI and Fibre Channel disks as storage options.  So, how would you go about setting up a virtual Windows Server 2008 test cluster using the new Hyper-V vitalisation product?  The method I am about to outline is a little different to what you might be used to Virtual Server 2005.  The following steps detail how I managed to setup a test cluster using simulated iSCSI storage.  Before beginning it’s worth reviewing this article that outlines the storage options that are available to Hyper-V.  By the end of this post you should have a simple two node cluster up and running using simulated iSCSI storage.

Tools for the job:

  • A Windows Server 2008 server x64 server with the Hyper-V role enabled (I used a Dell Precision 390)
  • One Windows Server 2008 VM to act as a Domain Controller (Clusters must be part of a domain) 
  • Two Windows Server 2008 VMs to act as Cluster Nodes
  • One Windows Server 2003 SP2 VM (or you could use Windows Server 2008 in a Core install to maximise VM performance)
  • iSCSI Target Software: I used the StarWind product that is available as a 30 day eval.  Windows Storage Server is now available to MSDN/TechNet subscribers.
  • iSCSI Initiator software (built into Windows Server 2008)

I wont go into how to create a VM but you can find more info from Virtual Guys weblog.

Before I began looking into the iSCSI simulated storage option for my cluster nodes I tried to expose a single VHD to each of my cluster nodes in the hopes that they would share it.  I didn’t get very far and was presented with the following error when powering on the VMs

The HP Slate — Engadget January 9, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in Computers, Hardware, Slate, Tablet.
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The HP Slate — Engadget
The HP Slate

Here we go — press images of the HP Slate just hit the web, right as Ballmer showed it off during his CES keynote. The prototype device is said to be coming later this year, and it’s running Windows — Ballmer showed it running the PC Kindle app. It’s also multitouch, and can do some gaming — they showed it playing Frogger. Check one more pic and the teaser vid after the break. And trust us — we’re going to find out everything about this thing before we’re done.

 

How to: Add or Remove Nodes in a SQL Server Failover Cluster (Setup) January 8, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft KBs.
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How to: Add or Remove Nodes in a SQL Server Failover Cluster (Setup)
How to: Add or Remove Nodes in a SQL Server Failover Cluster (Setup)

Use this procedure to manage nodes to an existing SQL Server failover cluster instance.

Important:
To update or remove a SQL Server failover cluster, you must be a local administrator with permission to log in as a service on all nodes of the failover cluster. For local installations, you must run Setup as an administrator. If you install SQL Server from a remote share, you must use a domain account that has read and execute permissions on the remote share.

Setup does not install .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 on a clustered operating system. You must install .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 before you run Setup.

You may need to apply cumulative updates to the original media before you install SQL Server 2008, if you are affected by a known issue in the setup program. For more information about known issues and detailed instructions, see .

Note that Setup operations for SQL Server failover clustering have changed in this release. To install or upgrade a SQL Server failover cluster, you must run the Setup program on each node of the failover cluster.

To add a node to an existing SQL Server failover cluster, you must run SQL Server Setup on the node that is to be added to the SQL Server failover cluster instance. Do not run Setup on the active node.

To remove a node from an existing SQL Server failover cluster, you must run SQL Server Setup on the node that is to be removed from the SQL Server failover cluster instance.

To view procedural steps to add or remove nodes, select one of the following operations:

Important:
The operating system drive letter for SQL Server install locations must match on all the nodes added to the SQL Server failover cluster.

 Add Node

 To add a node to an existing SQL Server 2008 failover cluster

  1. Insert the SQL Server installation media, and from the root folder, double-click setup.exe. To install from a network share, navigate to the root folder on the share, and then double-click Setup.exe. You may be asked to install the prerequisites if they are not previously installed.

  2. Windows Installer 4.5 is required, and may be installed by the Installation Wizard. If you are prompted to restart your computer, restart, and then start SQL Server 2008 Setup.exe again.

  3. When prerequisites are installed, the Installation Wizard will launch the SQL Server Installation Center. To add a node to an existing failover cluster instance, click Installation in the left-hand pane. Then, select Add node to a SQL Server failover cluster.

  4. The System Configuration Checker will run a discovery operation on your computer. To continue, click OK. Setup log files have been created for your installation. For more information about log files, see How to: View and Read SQL Server Setup Log Files.

  5. On the Product key page, specify the PID key for a production version of the product. Note that the product key you enter for this installation must be for the same SQL Server 2008 edition as that which is installed on the active node.

  6. On the License Terms page, read the license agreement, and then select the check box to accept the licensing terms and conditions. To continue, click Next. To end Setup, click Cancel.

  7. The Installation Wizard will install SQL Server prerequisites if they are not already on the computer. They include the following:

    • SQL Server Setup Support Files

    To install prerequisites, click Install.

  8. The System Configuration Checker will verify the system state of your computer before Setup continues. After the check is complete, click Next to continue.

  9. On the Cluster Node Configuration page, use the drop-down box to specify the name of the SQL Server 2008 failover cluster instance that will be modified during this Setup operation.

  10. On the Server Configuration — Service Accounts page, specify login accounts for SQL Server services. The actual services that are configured on this page depend on the features you selected to install. For failover cluster installations, account name and startup type information will be pre-populated on this page based on settings provided for the active node. You must provide passwords for each account. For more information, see SQL Server Configuration – Service Accounts and Setting Up Windows Service Accounts.

    Security Note   Do not use a blank password. Use a strong password.

    When you are finished specifying login information for SQL Server services, click Next.

  11. On the Error and Usage Reporting page, specify the information you would like to send to Microsoft that will help to improve SQL Server. By default, options for error reporting and feature usage are enabled. For more information, see Error and Usage Report Settings.

  12. The System Configuration Checker will run one more set of rules to validate your computer configuration with the SQL Server features you have specified.

  13. The Ready to Add Node page displays a tree view of installation options that were specified during Setup.

  14. Add Node Progress page provides status so you can monitor add node progress as Setup proceeds.

  15. After installation, the Complete page provides a link to the summary log file for the installation and other important notes. To complete the SQL Server installation process, click Close.

  16. If you are instructed to restart the computer, do so now. It is important to read the message from the Installation Wizard when you are done with Setup. For information about Setup log files, see How to: View and Read SQL Server Setup Log Files.

 Remove Node

 To remove a node from an existing SQL Server 2008 failover cluster

  1. Insert the SQL Server installation media. From the root folder, double-click setup.exe. To install from a network share, navigate to the root folder on the share, and then double-click setup.exe. . If the Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Setup dialog box appears, click OK to install the prerequisites, then click Cancel to quit the SQL Server 2008 installation.

  2. Windows Installer 4.5 is required, and may be installed by the Installation Wizard. If you are prompted to restart your computer, restart and then start SQL Server 2008 setup.exe again.

  3. When prerequisites are installed, the Installation Wizard will launch the SQL Server Installation Center. To remove a node from an existing failover cluster instance, click Maintenance in the left-hand pane, and then select Remove node from a SQL Server failover cluster.

  4. The System Configuration Checker will run a discovery operation on your computer. To continue, click OK. Setup log files have been created for your installation. For more information about log files, see How to: View and Read SQL Server Setup Log Files.

  5. The Installation Wizard will install SQL Server prerequisites if they are not already on the computer. They include the following:

    • SQL Server Setup Support Files

    To install prerequisites, click Install.

  6. The System Configuration Checker will verify the system state of your computer before Setup continues. After the check is complete, click Next to continue.

  7. On the Cluster Node Configuration page, use the drop-down box to specify the name of the SQL Server 2008 failover cluster instance that will be modified during this Setup operation. The node that will be removed will be listed in the "Name of this node" field.

  8. The Ready to Remove page displays a tree view of options that will be removed during Setup. To continue, click Remove.

  9. During the remove operation, the Remove Node Progress page provides status.

  10. The Complete page provides a link to the summary log file for the remove node operation and other important notes. To complete the SQL Server remove node operation, click Close. For information about Setup log files, see How to: View and Read SQL Server Setup Log Files.

Changes to remote administration in Windows Server 2008 January 8, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft KBs.
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Changes to remote administration in Windows Server 2008

Changes to remote administration in Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2

In Windows Server 2003, you can start the RDC client (Mstsc.exe) by using the /console switch to remotely connect to the physical console session on the server (also known as session 0). In Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2, the /console switch has been deprecated. For more information, see the “Why the /console switch is no longer needed” section. In Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2, session 0 is a noninteractive session that is reserved for services.

You can use the new /admin switch to remotely connect to a Windows Server 2008-based server for administrative purposes. The /admin switch is introduced in RDC 6.1. RDC 6.1 is included in the following operating systems:

  • Windows Server 2008
  • Windows Server 2008 R2
  • Windows Vista Service Pack 1 (SP1)
  • Windows XP Service Pack 3 (SP3)
Note RDC 6.1 (6.0.6001) supports Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) 6.1.

RDC 6.1 does not support the /console switch. However, for backward compatibility, you can use the /admin switch to connect to the physical console session on a Windows Server 2003-based server. For example, to connect from a Windows Vista SP1-based client to the physical console session of a Windows Server 2003-based server, run the mstsc.exe /admin command.

If you try to use the /console switch together with the RDC 6.1 client, the behavior is as follows.

Collapse this tableExpand this table
Scenario Behavior
You type mstsc.exe /console at the command prompt, and then you connect to a remote server that does not have Terminal Server installed. The /console switch is silently ignored. You will be connected to a session to remotely administer the server.
For more information about the Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2 behavior, see the "When you connect to a server that does not have Terminal Server installed" section.
You type mstsc.exe /console at the command prompt, and then you connect to a remote server that has Terminal Server installed. The /console switch is silently ignored. You will be connected to a standard Remote Desktop session that requires a Terminal Services client access license (TS CAL).
In the RDC client UI, you specify Computer_name /console in the Computer box, and then you click Connect.

Note Computer_name represents the name of the remote computer to which you want to connect.

You receive an “An unknown parameter was specified in computer name field" error message.
In the .rdp file, you specify /console in the full address property, and then you try to start the Remote Desktop connection. You receive an "An unknown parameter was specified in computer name field" error message.
In the .rdp file, you specify the connect to console property, and then you start the Remote Desktop connection. The property is silently ignored. You will be connected to a session that requires a TS CAL.
You programmatically call the put_ConnectToServerConsole function or the get_ConnectToServerConsole function of the IMsRdpClientAdvancedSettings interface. The function fails, and it returns an S_FALSE value.

Why the /console switch is no longer needed

In Windows Server 2003, you use the Mstsc.exe /console command to start a Remote Desktop session for the following reasons:

  • To connect to session 0
    Some applications are installed and run only in session 0. This is because the applications have to communicate with services that run in session 0 or because the applications have to display user interface (UI) elements that are displayed in session 0.
  • To connect back to an existing session on the physical console
    Because the physical console session in Windows Server 2003 is always session 0, the only way that you can reconnect to this session is by using the /console switch.

In Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2, the /console switch functionality is no longer needed for the following reasons:

  • Improved application compatibility guarantees that legacy applications that have to communicate with services in session 0 will be installed and run in sessions other than session 0. Additionally, if the service that is associated with an application tries to display UI elements in session 0, a built-in capability in Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2 and in Windows Vista enables you to view and to interact with the session 0 UI from your session. Windows Server 2008/Windows Server 2008 R2 session 0 is a noninteractive session that is reserved for services. Therefore, there is no need for you to explicitly connect to this session.

    Note For more information about session 0 isolation in Windows Vista, view the "Impact of Session 0 Isolation on Services and Drivers in Windows Vista" topic on the following Microsoft Web site:

  • Because the physical console session is never session 0, you can always reconnect to your existing session on the physical console. The Restrict Terminal Services users to a single remote session Group Policy setting determines whether you can connect to your existing physical console session. This setting is available in the Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Terminal Services\Terminal Server\Connections node of the Local Group Policy Editor. You can also configure this setting in Terminal Services Configuration. The Restrict each user to a single session setting appears in Edit settings in the General section.

How the /admin switch behaves

You can run the RDC 6.1 client (Mstsc.exe) together with the /admin switch to remotely administer a Windows Server 2008-based server that has or does not have Terminal Server installed. However, if you are trying to remotely administer a Windows Server 2008-based server that does not have the Terminal Server role service installed, you do not have to use the /admin switch. In this case, the same connection behavior occurs with or without the /admin switch. At any point in time, there can be two active remote administration sessions. To start a remote administration session, you must be a member of the Administrators group on the server to which you are connecting.

When you connect to a server that does not have Terminal Server installed

If a member of the Administrators group starts a Remote Desktop session to a Windows Server 2008-based server that does not have the Terminal Server role service installed, the following conditions are true for the remote administration session:

  • Time zone redirection is disabled.
  • Terminal Services Session Broker (TS Session Broker) redirection is disabled.
  • Plug and Play device redirection is disabled.
  • The remote session theme is changed to Windows Classic.
  • Terminal Services Easy Print is disabled.

When you connect to a server that has Terminal Server installed

If a member of the Administrators group starts a Remote Desktop session to a Windows Server 2008-based server that has the Terminal Server role service installed, they must use the /admin switch to connect to a session to remotely administer the server. The following conditions are true for the session:

  • You do not have to have a TS CAL to remotely administer a terminal server.
  • Time zone redirection is disabled.
  • Terminal Services Session Broker redirection is disabled.
  • Plug and Play device redirection is disabled.
  • The remote session theme is changed to Windows Classic.
  • Terminal Services Easy Print is disabled.

Changes to APIs

If you are using RDC 6.1, you can no longer use the ConnectToServerConsole property of the IMsRdpClientAdvancedSettings interface to specify whether the Remote Desktop ActiveX control should try to connect to the server for administrative purposes. Instead, you must use the ConnectToAdministerServer property of the IMsRdpClientAdvancedSettings6 interface to connect to one of the following sessions:

  • The physical console session on a Windows Server 2003-based computer
  • The session that is used for administrative purposes on a Windows Server 2008-based computer

For more information about the ConnectToServerConsole property, visit the following Web site:

For more information about the ConnectToAdministerServer property, visit the following Web site:

Talking about How to Enable an Extra Tab Add-ins in Windows Live Messenger Options Dialog Box? – Windows Live Comm January 7, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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How to Enable an Extra Tab Add-ins in Windows Live Messenger Options Dialog Box? – Windows Live Comm
How to Enable an Extra Tab Add-ins in Windows Live Messenger Options Dialog Box?

Did you know there is an extra hidden tab in Windows Live Messenger Option dialog box? Its called "Add-in". I don’t know why its hidden by default? Today I found a registry hack to enable it in WLM while playing with WLM’s EXE file in Resource Hacker.

Before:

After:

So here is step-by-step tutorial to enable it:

1. Open regedit and goto:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\MSNMessenger

2. In right-side pane, create a new DWORD value and give it name “AddInFeatureEnabled” and set its value to 1

3. Thats it. Now open Windows Live Messenger and goto “Tools -> Options” and you’ll see a new tab "Add-ins" at last.