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DFS Choose a Namespace Type May 26, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions.
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Choose a Namespace Type
Choose a Namespace TypeApplies To: Windows Server 2008 R2When creating a namespace, you must choose one of two namespace types: a stand-alone namespace or a domain-based namespace. In addition, if you choose a domain-based namespace, you must choose a namespace mode: Windows 2000 Server mode or Windows Server 2008 mode.

Choosing a namespace type

Choose a stand-alone namespace if any of the following conditions apply to your environment:

  • Your organization does not use Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS).
  • You want to increase the availability of the namespace by using a failover cluster.
  • You need to create a single namespace with more than 5,000 DFS folders in a domain that does not meet the requirements for a domain-based namespace (Windows Server 2008 mode)—as described later in this topic.
    Note
    To check the size of a namespace, right-click the namespace in the DFS Management console tree, click Properties, and then view the namespace size in the Namespace Properties dialog box. For more information about DFS Namespace scalability, see the Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=92838).

Choose a domain-based namespace if any of the following conditions apply to your environment:

  • You want to ensure the availability of the namespace by using multiple namespace servers.
  • You want to hide the name of the namespace server from users. This makes it easier to replace the namespace server or migrate the namespace to another server.

Choosing a domain-based namespace mode

If you choose a domain-based namespace, you must choose whether to use the Windows 2000 Server mode or the Windows Server 2008 mode. The Windows Server 2008 mode includes support for access-based enumeration and increased scalability. The domain-based namespace introduced in Windows 2000 Server is now referred to as "domain-based namespace (Windows 2000 Server mode)."

To use the Windows Server 2008 mode, the domain and namespace must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • The forest uses the Windows Server 2003 or higher forest functional level.
  • The domain uses the Windows Server 2008 domain functional level.
  • All namespace servers are running Windows Server 2008.

If your environment supports it, choose the Windows Server 2008 mode when you create new domain-based namespaces. This mode provides additional features and scalability, and also eliminates the possible need to migrate a namespace from the Windows 2000 Server mode.

For information about migrating a namespace to Windows Server 2008 mode, see Migrate a Domain-based Namespace to Windows Server 2008 Mode.

If your environment does not support domain-based namespaces in Windows Server 2008 mode, use the existing Windows 2000 Server mode for the namespace.

Comparing namespace types and modes

The characteristics of each namespace type and mode are described in the following table.

 

Characteristic Stand-Alone Namespace Domain-based Namespace (Windows 2000 Server Mode) Domain-based Namespace (Windows Server 2008 Mode)

Path to namespace

\\ServerName\RootName

\\NetBIOSDomainName\RootName

\\DNSDomainName\RootName

\\NetBIOSDomainName\RootName

\\DNSDomainName\RootName

Namespace information storage location

In the registry and in a memory cache on the namespace server

In AD DS and in a memory cache on each namespace server

In AD DS and in a memory cache on each namespace server

Namespace size recommendations

The namespace can contain more than 5,000 folders with targets

The size of the namespace object in AD DS should be less than 5 megabytes (MB) to maintain compatibility with domain controllers that are not running Windows Server 2008. This means no more than approximately 5,000 folders with targets.

The namespace can contain more than 5,000 folders with targets

Minimum AD DS forest functional level

AD DS is not required

Windows 2000

Windows Server 2003

Minimum AD DS domain functional level

AD DS is not required

Windows 2000 mixed

Windows Server 2008

Minimum supported namespace servers

Windows 2000 Server

Windows 2000 Server

Windows Server 2008

Support for access-based enumeration (if enabled)

Yes, requires Windows Server 2008 namespace server

No

Yes

Supported methods to ensure namespace availability

Create a stand-alone namespace on a failover cluster.

Use multiple namespace servers to host the namespace. (The namespace servers must be in the same domain.)

Use multiple namespace servers to host the namespace. (The namespace servers must be in the same domain.)

Support for using DFS Replication to replicate folder targets

Supported when joined to an AD DS domain

Supported

Supported

Internet Speed Issue – Bandwidth VS. Throughput May 24, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions.
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Internet Speed Issue – Bandwidth VS. Throughput
Internet Speed Issue – Bandwidth VS. Throughput

Most of Internet users (I met) are a bit confused about meaning and definition of Throughput and Bandwidth. If you are non-computer person or just happy with Internet connectivity, probably those terms, throughput and bandwidth, are in out of your sight. However some people who are living with e-commers field, Stock trader, most of IT professionals are really sensitive for downloading speed.  Size of Internet and ISP’s backbone speed is quickly upgraded day by day. I heard one of tier1 ISP, Verizon, provides 40Mbps download and 20Mbps upload Fios service for business. Furthermore, price is really competitive.

Anyway, if you have a high speed broadband or serial links (DS3, OCs and Metro Ethernet) for Internet, do you believe maximum download speed is same as your subscribed Internet speed? In another word, if you have DS3 45Mbps (bandwidth) link to ISP, do you think you will get 45Mbps downloading speed? or TCP throughput, when you download files or transferring data to other location? Most of people might say, of course that’s what I am paying for. However answer is "Yes" and "NO". Let’s figure why that is!

 Definition

First, let’s see what is definition of Throughput and Bandwidth. From the Wikipedia,

Definition of Bandwidth is
"A data rate measured in bits per second"

Definition of Throughput is
"Average rate of successful message delivery over a communication channel. These data may be delivered over a physical or logical link, or pass through a certain network node."

 

Bandwidth

In general, both Bandwidth and Throughput are usually measured in bit per second.
Meaning of Bandwidth is not too difficult to understand. Also, scope of bandwidth is normally considered between ISP edge device (router) and CPE.
See below diagram shown DS3 (45Mbps) VS. T1 (1.5Mbps). Simply says DS3 is 28 times bigger than T1. Easy~

Pic 1 – Bandwidth VS. Throughput

Throughput

Understanding of Throughput is sort of trick and you might need to use your brain a bit. See below picture shown simple testing environment involved a server and client devices are located at US and other client device is located far away at Asia (China). All connection to ISPs is 45Mbps (high-speed Internet).

Let’s assume below conditions

  • All devices have same TCP window size 64K bytes(65535bytes, standard size for most of window OS, but not NT and older)
  • Testing devices are only machines are connected to ISP on each locations.
  • Testing devices are only machines are generated traffic between locations.
  • No congestion between nodes.
  • No packet lost betwween nodes.
  • RTT(Round Trip Time) is Server(New York) to Client (Chicago) = 30ms
  • RTT(Round Trip Time) is Server(New York) to Client (Japan) = 200ms

** Above RTT is average of realistic value between nodes.


Pic 2 – Bandwidth VS. Throughput

 


Pic 3 – Bandwidth VS. Throughput

Based on TCP Throughput calculation formula, throughput of upload / download between each node are below.

 

TCP Throughput NY to Chicago = 512000 (64000 bytes x 8) bits / 0.03 second = 17066666 bps = 17Mbps 

 

TCP Throughput NY to Japan = 512000 (64000 bytes x 8) bits / 0.2 second = 2560000 bps = 2.560Mbps

 

Here is a theoretical TCP throughput under the assumption; both clients at Chicago and Japan won’t reach 45Mbps bandwidth which is subscribed bandwidth.

So, while the client at Chicago was downloading a file or transferring data from the server at New York, both end of DS3 links will be utilized only 37% of total bandwidth. Also, in other case, both side of DS3 will be utilized only 5.6% of total bandwidth.

So, we can imagine that simply 3 clients can transfer data at the same time without overutilization in the first case (Pic 2), and on the second case (Pic 3); about 17.5 clients can transfer data.

Now, you might say "It is not true, I get more than 35Mbps throughput at similar environment!" Okay Okay, hold on~. Yes you can get more throughputs. I didn’t say you can get better throughput. We have reviewed in general circumstance. We will talk about how we can increase throughput on other article within Internet Speed Issue series. – "Internet Speed Issue – How to use TCP window scaling option".

I hope you got some idea about what are Throughput and bandwidth

More business upgrading to t3 ds3 connections May 24, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions.
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Quote

More business upgrading to t3 ds3 connections
More Businesses are upgrading to T3 DS3 ConnectionsDespite the fast speed of cable and DSL and most recently FIOS from Verizon, they only meet the needs of a home based business or a business with fewer than ten $10$ employees. For most businesses with more than ten $10$ employees, a T1 line has been the standard solution thanks to their reliability and availability pretty much anywhere in the US. During the last couple of years, more growing businesses are upgrading to a T3 or DS3 connection, which is now more and more the solution of choice.

T1 connections (1.544 Mbps) and T3 connections (45 Mbps) are traditional business-class digital leased lines. The technology is pre-cable and pre-DSL. The main advantage is quality of service: If a T1 line goes down, the phone company has a much faster time of repair (usually within 4 hours) than a DSL line (could take a day or longer). Businesses rely on these broadband connections for their revenues and bottomline. A circuit down can cost thousands of dollars an hour. The T1 and T3 lines also have time-tested monitoring and diagnostic capabilities to keep them up, so they are more reliable.

A T1 line has 24 channels. Each channel can either be used for a phone line or 64 Kbps of Internet. A business can have 8 phone lines and 1024 Kbps of Internet (16 X 64 Kbps) over a T1 circuit for on average of between $300-$700.

A T3 line has 672 channels and costs several thousand dollars a month (from $2,000 to $7,000 depending on the provider and service location). The cost has steadily decreased the last several years making it more cost effective for a growing business to choose the T3 network.

Often a business will optimize capability and cost by choosing a fractional T3 (starting at 10 mbps) rather than a full T3 line. The obvious benefit is reduced cost and yet allow the scalability of a T3 circuit of up to 45 mbps.

There’s also the private line T3, also known as point to point T3 or point to point DS3. For example, you could have a private line between two businesses with no Internet security risk. This is a very useful solution for media companies and companies with various locations needing to transfer data between locations and run VOIP.

The T3 service is symmetrical (45 mbps upstream/downstream), unlike most DSL and cable lines; you get the same speed in both directions which is very important for businesses, especially those exchanging data between offices and uploading a lot of files.

Cost mostly depends on distance. This boils down to two simple components; local loop and the port. The local loop cost is the cost the local phone company charges to transport the signal from the end user’s central office, otherwise known as a CO, to the point of presence, otherwise known as a POP, of the carrier. The port cost is the cost to access the network or the Internet through the carrier’s network. Typically, the port price is based upon access speed and yearly commitment level while the loop is based on location and yearly commitment. The further the CO and POP, the more the loop cost.

If your business is growing and bonded T1’s no longer can handle your bandwidth needs, then upgrading to a T3/DS3 line for reliability, scalability, performance, and capacity is most likely the best decision you’ll make for meeting your company’s growth.

HTML 5 Tag Reference May 23, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions.
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HTML 5 Tag Reference
HTML 5HTML 5 improves interoperability and reduces development costs by making precise rules on how to handle all HTML elements, and how to recover from errors.Some of the new features in HTML 5 are functions for embedding audio, video, graphics, client-side data storage, and interactive documents. HTML 5 also contains new elements like , , , and .The HTML 5 working group includes AOL, Apple, Google, IBM, Microsoft, Mozilla, Nokia, Opera, and many hundreds of other vendors.

Microsoft Gets It Right with Windows Phone 7 May 23, 2010

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Microsoft Gets It Right with Windows Phone 7
Microsoft Gets It Right with Windows Phone 7

As I write this, I’m at the MIX10 conference in Las Vegas, where Microsoft is telling the world its developer stories for Windows Phone 7 and Internet Explorer (IE) 9. I’ll be covering these developments all week. But last week, in a small meeting room on Microsoft’s ever-expanding Redmond campus, I had a much more exciting opportunity. I finally got some hands-on time with Windows Phone 7.

And exciting is absolutely the word for it. Looking back over the past 15+ years of covering the tech industry professionally, I can recall only a few moments of actual excitement and even fewer where the initial buzz didn’t die down as quickly as it came. But Windows Phone is a game changer, and that’s something that we can’t say all that often about Microsoft products. The fact that it comes so soon after the iPhone—itself a game changer of historic proportions—and competes in the same market is, perhaps, most astonishing of all.

There’s a lot of marketing hoo-hah around Windows Phone. Spend any time investigating this platform and you’ll hear terms like "delightful" and "smart design" repeated again and again. But Microsoft isn’t just shaking it for all its worth for marketing’s sake. Its previous mobile platform, Windows Mobile, is a dud after a decade of neglect. And as exemplified by the iPhone, the smartphone market has suddenly heated up. This market will quickly outpace the PC market in terms of both volume and annual revenues.

Microsoft could have taken the easy way out with Windows Phone. In fact, it was previously working on Project Photon, which would have become Windows Mobile 7 and done just that. But instead, it did something that the software giant so rarely does: the right thing, which in this case, means starting over and righting the wrongs of the past.

A list describing those wrongs would be long enough to fill a book. I don’t have that much space, so let me deliver some highlights. Let’s start with the most obvious element of this system: the thing that you’ll look at and touch. This is the user experience.

In the wake of the iPhone, other smartphones have fallen into a familiar (if not old fashioned) single-tasking application-centric approach, marked by a grid of icons, each of which provides access to a single function such as Facebook or email. On Windows Phone, Microsoft has stepped back and reengineered the system to accommodate the user instead of the applications. That means an intelligent and dynamic Start screen that—God help me—is actually delightful. And useful, which is perhaps more important. It means that if you want to view photos shared on Flickr, Windows Live, or Facebook, you just navigate to a beautiful Pictures hub, a panoramic experience that aggregates content from multiple services and applications. You don’t have to dive in and out of individual applications to view this material separately and disjointedly. Smart.

From a hardware standpoint, Windows Mobile is a mess. There are likely no examples of any human being walking into a wireless store and declaring his or her desire to buy a Windows Mobile phone. Instead, some people end up with Windows Mobile phones because those devices meet some need. More often than not, some third party (a wireless carrier or phone maker) has obliterated the Windows Mobile UI and replaced it with a front-end of its own. (And if there is any sadder commentary on the state of Windows Mobile right now, I can’t think of it.) Windows Phones will be consistent. There will be two screen sizes: 800×480 screens (which is all we’re seeing right now) and later smaller 480×320 screens. The UI cannot be replaced by a third party. Instead, wireless carriers and phone makers can add their own hubs and applications and not muddy the work Microsoft has done. The list of required hardware is long, rigid, and wonderful:

  • A capacitive touch screen with four or more contact points
  • A full complement of sensors, including A-GPS, accelerometer, compass, light, and proximity
  • A high-quality camera (5 megapixels or more) with a flash and a dedicated camera button
  • 256 MB RAM or more and 8GB or more Flash memory
  • A DirectX 9-capable GPU
  • An ARMv7 Cortex/Scorpion or better processor
  • Three hardware buttons (Start, Search, and Back) on the front of the device in the exact same location

A hardware keyboard, it turns out, is optional. That’s because there will be multiple device form factors, giving users choice where it matters most. So when people go into the stores and declare their desire for a Windows Phone experience, they’re going to get it. And on a range of devices.

Another long-time annoyance with Windows Mobile is the software updating process. For reasons that have long benefitted its mobile industry partners and harmed users, Microsoft has never allowed Windows Mobile users to update their system to new software versions. (Very, very few device makers and wireless partners ever provided any upgrade paths of their own.) The reason for this is simple: Wireless companies make more money when you buy a new phone—and thus reset your contract out another two years—than they do by providing users with free updates. So that’s been the model.

Not anymore. As Apple does with the iPhone, Microsoft will "own" everything about the Windows Phone user experience. This includes the UI, of course, but also some other things—such as device drivers and the phone dialer—that the company previously farmed out to device makers and mobile operators. And, thank the heavens, this also includes the updating process. So with Windows Phone 7, Microsoft can and will deliver critical and other software updates via a Windows Update mechanism, up to and including updating any and all of the software that’s preinstalled on the device. Bravo.

For developers, the picture is rosy, too. Windows Phone supports two primary development interfaces. There’s XNA for games and Silverlight for more traditional applications. Silverlight is essentially a Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF)-like presentation framework on top of .NET. We’re talking Visual Studio for coding, Expression Blend for UI design, and programming models that developers already understand. Best of all, those wanting to get into Windows Phone development can do so for nothing—the tools are all free—and then get their apps hosted in a new Windows Marketplace environment that will surprise people. (It’s available both on the phone and on the PC, in the latter case via Zune software.)

And before any of this scares off you enterprise/business customers, relax. Microsoft hasn’t forgotten how it got here, and Windows Phone will offer the most compelling smartphone feature set it’s ever delivered for businesses. It will have new versions of the Office Mobile apps. Direct integration with SharePoint. Support for multiple Exchange ActiveSync accounts, providing seamless integration of business and home email, contacts, and calendars if you want it. And this summer (I’m thinking around the time of TechEd 2010 in June), Microsoft will announce that businesses can deploy internal Windows Phone applications privately using an as-yet unnamed "common distribution system." I’m guessing this means Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) or System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM).

Windows Phone combines those very few things that were right about Windows Mobile—primarily some business functionality—with a much wider set of new functionality that’s exciting in both scope and possibilities. And that’s the thing about Windows Phone 7. I can’t shake the feeling of excitement, and while I keep waiting for some unfortunate bit of reality to come crashing down and ruin this vibe, it’s lasted far longer than seems reasonable. It’s been a long time, it really has.

Error message when you try to upload a large file to a document library on a Windows SharePoint Serv May 22, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions.
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Error message when you try to upload a large file to a document library on a Windows SharePoint Serv
Error message when you try to upload a large file to a document library on a Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 site: "Request timed out"

SYMPTOMS

When you try to upload a large file to a document library on a Microsoft Windows…

When you try to upload a large file to a document library on a Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 site, you receive the following error message:

Request timed out.

This problem occurs if the following conditions are true:

RESOLUTION

To resolve this issue, use one or more of the following methods: Increase the ma…

To resolve this issue, use one or more of the following methods:

  • Increase the maximum upload size for the virtual server settings in Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS).
  • Increase the connection time-out setting in IIS.
  • Add the executionTimeout value in the Web.config file.

Increase the maximum upload size

  1. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click SharePoint Central Administration. Then, click Application Management.
  2. Under SharePoint Web Application Management, click Web application general settings.
  3. On the Web Application General Settings page, click the Web application that you want to change.
  4. Under Maximum upload size, type the maximum file size in megabytes that you want, and then click OK. You can specify a maximum file size up to 2,047 megabytes.

Increase the connection time-out setting

By default, the IIS connection time-out setting is 120 seconds. To increase the connection time-out setting, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager.
  2. Right-click the virtual server that you want to configure, and then click Properties.
  3. Click the Web Site tab. Under Connections, type the number of seconds that you want in the Connection time-out box, and then click OK.

Add the executionTimeout value

  1. Use Notepad to open the Web.config file.

    By default, this file is in the following location:

    Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web server extensions\12\TEMPLATE\LAYOUTS
  2. Add the executionTimeout value that you want. For example, replace the value as follows.

    Existing code

     <location path="upload.aspx"> 
        <system.web> 
          <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="2097151" /> 
        </system.web> 
      </location> 

    Replacement code

     <location path="upload.aspx"> 
        <system.web> 
          <httpRuntime executionTimeout="999999" maxRequestLength="2097151" /> 
        </system.web> 
      </location> 

  3. After you change the file, click Save on the File menu.
  4. Use Notepad to open the Web application Web.config file. By default, this file is in the following folder:
    Inetpub\wwwroot\wss\VirtualDirectories\VirtualDirectoryFolder
  5. Change the following line in the file.

    Existing line

    <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="51200" />

    Replacement line

    <httpRuntime executionTimeout="999999" maxRequestLength="51200" />
    

  6. After you change the file, click Save on the File menu.
  7. Exit Notepad.

MORE INFORMATION

On a Windows Server 2008 computer that has IIS 7.0-only installations, you add t…

On a Windows Server 2008 computer that has IIS 7.0-only installations, you add the maxAllowedContentLength value. When you are running Windows SharePoint Services on a Windows Server 2008-based computer that has IIS 7.0, you find that you cannot upload files that are larger than 28 MB even though you have configured the large file upload settings. Usually, the error that users see is "The page cannot be displayed." In some circumstances, users may also see an "HTTP 404" error.

To work around this problem, set in the Web.config file for the Web application to have following settings under the <configuration> section:

  • Use Notepad to open the Web application Web.config file. By default, this file is in the following folder:
    Inetpub\wwwroot\wss\VirtualDirectories\VirtualDirectoryFolder
  • Add the following settings under the <configuration> section of the Web.config file:
    <system.webServer><security><requestFiltering><requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="52428800"/></requestFiltering></security></system.webServer>

Note maxAllowedContentLength="52428800" in bytes has to match the size of file that you are trying to upload. Also, when you set the number, increase it slightly beyond the maximum file upload size that you have configured in SharePoint. If the number is equal to or less, users will not receive the error message that they are exceeding the size limit if they try to upload a file size larger than that specified by the administrator.

For more information about the maxAllowedContentLength setting, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

942074  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/942074/ ) Error message when you visit a Web site that is hosted on a server that is running Internet Information Services 7.0: "HTTP Error 404.13 – CONTENT_LENGTH_TOO_LARGE"

SharePoint 2007 and PDF indexing May 20, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions.
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Steven Van de Craen’s Blog – SharePoint 2007 and PDF indexing
SharePoint 2007 and PDF indexing

By default the SharePoint 2007 Search indexed only the meta data of a PDF document. By installing and configuring a PDF IFilter the Search will also index the contents of the PDF document. This allows users to find documents based on text inside the document. This process is called full text indexing.

[Indexing Server]: the server(s) in the SharePoint Farm that has/have the "Indexing" Role assigned. In a small farm this can be a single server for all roles.

[Web Front End Server]: the server(s) in the SharePoint Farm  that has/have the "Web Front End" Role assigned. In a small farm this can be a single server for all roles.

Windows SharePoint Services 3.0

[Indexing Server]

  1. Install the PDF IFilter (see below for a list of available IFilters)
  2. Add the .pdf file type to the index list:
    1. Open the Registry Editor (Start > Run > regedit)
    2. Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Shared Tools\Web Server Extensions\12.0\Search\Applications\<GUID>\Gather\Search\Extensions\ExtensionList
    3. Add a new String Value
      1. Value name: <next value in line>
      2. Value data: pdf
  3. [This step only applies to 64 bit servers]
    1. Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Shared Tools\Web Server Extensions\12.0\Search\Setup\ContentIndexCommon\Filters\Extension\.pdf
    2. Change the (Default) key value
      1. Old value: {4C904448-74A9-11D0-AF6E-00C04FD8DC02}
      2. (Foxit  x64 PDF IFilter) New value: {987F8D1A-26E6-4554-B007-6B20E2680632}
      3. (Adobe  x64 PDF IFilter) New value: {E8978DA6-047F-4E3D-9C78-CDBE46041603}
  4. Perform an iisreset
  5. Perform a Full Update on the Search content indexes
    1. Open a Command Prompt on the Indexing Server
    2. net stop spsearch
    3. net start spsearch
    4. cd "C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web server extensions\12\BIN"
    5. stsadm.exe –o spsearch -action fullcrawlstop
    6. stsadm.exe –o spsearch -action fullcrawlstart

[Web Front End Server]

  1. Copy the ICPDF.GIF () file to "C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\12\Template\Images"
  2. Edit the file C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web server extensions\12\Template\Xml\DOCICON.XML
    1. Add an entry for the .pdf extension
      <Mapping Key="pdf" Value="icpdf.gif"/>

Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007

[Indexing Server]

  1. Install the PDF IFilter (see below for a list of available IFilters)
  2. Add the .pdf file type to the index list:
    1. Go to Central Administration, then to the Shared Services Administration Web of the current SSP, go to Search Settings and next to File Type
    2. Add a new file type pdf
  3. [This step only applies to 64 bit servers]
    1. Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Shared Tools\Web Server Extensions\12.0\Search\Setup\ContentIndexCommon\Filters\Extension\.pdf
    2. Change the (Default) key value
      1. Old value: {4C904448-74A9-11D0-AF6E-00C04FD8DC02}
      2. (Foxit  x64 PDF IFilter) New value: {987F8D1A-26E6-4554-B007-6B20E2680632}
      3. (Adobe  x64 PDF IFilter) New value: {E8978DA6-047F-4E3D-9C78-CDBE46041603}
  4. Perform an iisreset
  5. Perform a Full Update on the Search content indexes
    1. Open a Command Prompt on the Indexing Server
    2. net stop osearch
    3. net start osearch
    4. Go to Central Administration, then to the Shared Services Administration Web of the current SSP, go to Search Settings and start a full crawl of all locations containing PDF files

[Web Front End Server]

  1. Copy the ICPDF.GIF () file to "C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\12\Template\Images"
  2. Edit the file C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web server extensions\12\Template\Xml\DOCICON.XML
    1. Add an entry for the .pdf extension
      <Mapping Key="pdf" Value="icpdf.gif"/>

Available IFilters

Adobe PDF IFilter 6.0x64

  • free (always good !)
  • 32 bit and 64 bit (64 bit released recently, applies to the [Indexing Server])

Foxit PDF IFilter v1.0

  • free for desktops, servers require a license
  • 32 bit and 64 bit (IA64 currently being tested, applies to the [Indexing Server])

Conclusion

Using the above procedure for either WSS 3.0 or MOSS 2007 it is possible to have your PDF document’s contents indexed by the SharePoint Search.

Use Configuration Manager (ConfigMgr) with Windows Server 2008 May 17, 2010

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions.
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Use Configuration Manager (ConfigMgr) with Windows Server 2008
Using Configuration Manager with Windows Server 2008

Queries and Collections
ConfigMgr offers no pre-built queries or collections specific to Windows Server 2008. To create a new query, start with an All Windows Server 2003 Systems query. In the new query, change the name of the OS to %Server 6.0%. The results are shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3 All Windows Server 2008 systems (Click the image for a larger view)
The query language to create a collection for only Windows Server 2008 is shown in Figure 4. A collection can be based upon this query to target the software distribution to only Windows Server 2008 servers.

 Figure 4 Query language for Windows Server 2008

select SMS_R_System.Name, SMS_R_System.SMSAssignedSites, SMS_R_System.IPAddresses, SMS_R_System.IPSubnets,
SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion, SMS_R_System.ResourceDomainOrWorkgroup, SMS_R_System.LastLogonUserDomain,
SMS_R_System.LastLogonUserName, SMS_R_System.SMSUniqueIdentifier, SMS_R_System.ResourceId, SMS_R_System.NetbiosName
from SMS_R_System where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like "%Server 6.0%"

How to use the Windows Server License Manager Script – slmgr.vbs May 5, 2010

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How to use the Windows Server License Manager Script – slmgr.vbs
What is slmgr.vbs?Microsoft’s command line licensing tool is slmgr.vbs. The name actually stands for Windows Software Licensing Management Tool. This is a visual basic script used to configure licensing on any Windows 2008 Server – either the full version or the core version. To see what slmgr.vbs can do, you can simply run a Windows command prompt (with cmd) and type:slmgr.vbs /?