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Microsoft Windows Server 8 Hyper-V March 3, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in BlogoSphere, Microsoft, Paul Thurrott, Platforms & EcoSystems, Windows Server.
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Wow! If I had to pick one word to describe my reaction to the new and improved Microsoft Hyper-V features in Windows Server 8, then wow would be it. A little smile crept onto my face when I saw all the features that will put Hyper-V on equal footing — or ahead of — the competition, from a pure machine virtualization-platform feature comparison.

Microsoft has been clear in its message that Windows Server 8 is the OS and virtualization platform, for both private environments and the public cloud. Hyper-V provides functionality that allows Windows Server 8 to be a true cloud solution. This typically means enough scalability, flexibility, and security or isolation capabilities to handle all the possible scenarios in a cloud solution that’s shared by different business units or even different organizations

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Why even waste a single dollar on VM-Ware. I’ve been running Hyper-V configurations for many years without much difficulty. They have proven reliable and consistent with a proper infrastructure design. It’s benefited my SMB customers by migrating VHDs instead of reinstalling application when upgrading to new server hardware,

Windows 8 Consumer Preview: Internet Explorer 10 Secrets March 3, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in BlogoSphere, Microsoft, Paul Thurrott, Platforms & EcoSystems, Windows.
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Looking at Windows 8 broadly, I think the most curious and interesting thing about this new operating system is its dual–and dueling–personalities. This is most obviously seen in Windows 8’s new Windows runtime, or WinRT, which provides a Metro-style environment and the Start screen in addition to the more traditional Windows desktop. But it can also be seen in Internet Explorer 10.

IE 10 is a curious beast. There are two versions of this application, really two completely separate applications, in Windows 8. One is a Metro-style app and more locked down and constrained while providing a unique full-screen browsing experience that will be useful on tablets and other highly mobile devices. The other is a traditional desktop application that looks and works much like its predecessor and is fully extensible with third-party add-ons.

The two share the same rendering engines, of course, the same bookmarks, and some basic features like tabs. But the interaction between these two separate IE versions may be unclear to most users. Add a third party browser or two, or muck around with configuring a different browser as the default, and things get even weirder.

So let’s discuss a few of what I consider to be IE 10’s biggest secrets. Some of these are subtle, but those who upgrade to Windows 8 in particular, this will be worth understanding.

Read More…Windows 8 Consumer Preview: Internet Explorer 10 Secrets