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Windows 8.1 Tip: Master Auto-Snap | Windows 8 content from Paul Thurrott’s SuperSite for Windows September 22, 2013

Posted by John Ruby in BlogoSphere, Paul Thurrott, Windows 8.
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One of the more interesting new features in Windows 8.1 is what I call Auto-Snap, the ability of certain actions in this OS to automatically enable Snap and place two Metro apps side-by-side. For example, when you open a picture-based email attachment in the Mail app, it opens side-by-side with Mail in the Photos app. Some people don’t like this behavior, but this simple tip will ease a bit of the pain.

Thanks to Clifford B, for tipping me off to this functionality.

(Metro) Snap debuted in Windows 8 as a way to run two apps side-by-side. But in that initial release of OS, Snap was very limited. It could only be triggered manually by the user, and yet was almost impossible to discover. And the snapped area was very small, and hard-coded to a specific pixel width, making side-by-side app usage almost pointless.

In Windows 8.1, Snap has been improved in many ways and is now far more usable. Auto-Snap is just one of those improvements: It is triggered when one app needs to open a document or other file in another app. So instead of opening the new app full-screen as before—triggering confusion on the user’s part, since many people had no idea how to get back to the original app—Auto Snap opens the new app side-by-side with the original app.

You can see this effect most clearly in the Mail app, though this isn’t the only example. When you open an attachment in Mail, the attachment opens in a new app alongside Mail. For example, here’s a picture attachment opening in the Photos app.

It’s worth mentioning, incidentally, that Auto-Snap is pretty intelligent, too. That picture attachment opens in such a way that the Photos app takes up most of the screen because a picture is visual and Microsoft understands that it requires more of the available screen real estate. But if you open a document or web URL, the app that opens those attachment types will open in a 50/50 split with Mail so you can more easily read both side-by-side.

Of course, you may want to view the second app full-screen, and once you’ve dealt with that second app, you probably want to then return to email (or whatever app you were originally using).

With a touch-based system, this is easy and works as before: You can simply drag the Snap border to a screen edge in either case. (Though of you hide the first app by displaying the second one full screen, you then need to know how to redisplay that first app, which is another issue.)

With the mouse, you can use Auto-Snap. You may already know that if you move the mouse cursor to the top of the screen in Windows 8/8.1, the cursor changes into what I call the "hamburger helper" cursor, shown here:

Note: Technically, this cursor is called the Link Select pointer.

This indicates that you can now drag the currently displayed app, to move it manually into a snapped position or to exit the app. But in Windows 8.1, you can also double-click when the cursor is in this mode. Using the previous example with the picture snapped next to Mail, doing so in the Photos app maximizes that app so that the picture is now full-screen:

But if you double-click on the hamburger helper cursor again—again, at the top of the screen—the Mail app will then reappear, full-screen. You can double-click in this way at the top of any Metro app to toggle the display of Snap.

So the next time Windows 8.1 triggers Auto-Snap, don’t despair. Just remember that you can double-click to toggle the display the way you prefer.

Windows 8.1 Tip: Master Auto-Snap | Windows 8 content from Paul Thurrott’s SuperSite for Windows

Martin Hatch – Blog: How to configure your Office365 public website to use the SharePoint Publishing Infrastructure June 10, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft, Server, Sharepoint, Software, Solutions, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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This is something that has bugged me for a LONG time .. I cannot possibly understand why SharePoint Online (with one of the most powerful Web Content Management Systems) was so thoroughly limited by cutting back to a really basic template editor. I can only think of 2 reasons:

  1. Microsoft assumes the average user won’t know how to use SharePoint, so wanted to provide a simpler user interface. This is fair enough, and if this IS the reason there should be no reason why I can’t go "behind the scenes" and setup the site any way I like (at my own risk .. as it were).
  2. Microsoft is trying to protect revenue from "SharePoint 2010 Server Internet Facing Sites" licenses. These are VERY expensive and a lot of companies will happily get rid of their on-premise install to put in a £80 a year Office 365 E1 plan to host their website.

Now .. if it is case (1) then we should be good to go. If it is case (2) then they probably have terms and conditions specifically stopping someone from doing this… so first off lets get the disclaimer out of the way 🙂

Martin Hatch – Blog: How to configure your Office365 public website to use the SharePoint Publishing Infrastructure

Createsiteinnewdb: Stsadm operation (Office SharePoint Server) June 9, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft, Server, Sharepoint, Software, Solutions, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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Description

Creates a site at the specified Uniform Resource Locator (URL) and creates a new content database using the user name and password you specify. If you do not specify a template to use, the owner can choose a template when he or she first browses to the site.

Createsiteinnewdb: Stsadm operation (Office SharePoint Server)

SharePoint Foundation 2010: How to Create Site Collection with a separate content database? June 9, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft, Server, Sharepoint, Software, Solutions, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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How to Create Site Collection with a separate content database?

Hi All,

one of the "Stsadm operations" is creating site collection with a separate content database. it’s very direct command and will help you to maintain your sites & its db.
createsiteinnewdb: will Create a site at the specified Uniform Resource Locator (URL) and create a new content database using the user name and password you specify. If you do not specify a template to use, the owner can choose a template when he or she first browses to the site.
Example:
stsadm -o createsiteinnewdb -url http://siteurl/sites/site1 -owneremail owner@sharepoint.com -ownerlogin spuser1  -sitetemplate STS#0 -title “site 1” description "site 1 desscription" -databaseserver "DBServer" -databasename “DB_Site1”

SharePoint Foundation 2010: How to Create Site Collection with a separate content database?

How to hide Recycling bin and View All Site Content May 31, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft, Server, Sharepoint, Software, Solutions, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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Hiding Recycle Bin and All site content in sharepoint 2010 is very simple do the following steps:

1) open site in sharepoint designer 2010

2) Click all files, then masterpage, then checkout the master page

3) go to

  <SharePoint:UIVersionedContent UIVersion="4" runat="server" id="PlaceHolderQuickLaunchBottomV4">
     <ContentTemplate>
      <ul style="display:none" >
       <li>
        <SharePoint:ClusteredSPLinkButton

4) add statement in bold

5) check in save

6) you can use this master page in your solution & provision it

How to hide Recycling bin and View All Site Content

Change the Masterpage of the Search Center May 27, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft, Sharepoint, Software, Solutions, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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This is a bit of a sticky situation. The default master is set to v4.master, but the default site page is built on a layout page which doesn’t use the default master. The layout page is assigned the master page by the Microsoft.SharePoint.Publishing.PublishingLayoutPage class, which hardcodes the master page as the custom master. There is a way to work around this and assign a different master page for the page layout, but the end result would probably not work very well.
Instead of changing the master page, I would suggest adding the top navigation bar to the page layout. This can be done by adding the following code to the SearchMain.aspx Page Layout. Edit it in Advanced Mode. Insert the following code right after this existing code (around line 100):
EXISTING CODE:
</ContentTemplate>
</SharePoint:UIVersionedContent>
<SharePoint:UIVersionedContent UIVersion="4" runat="server">
<ContentTemplate>
ADD THIS CODE:
  <div class="s4-lp s4-toplinks" style="background-image:url(/_layouts/images/selbg.png); background-repeat:no-repeat;
  repeat-x:left top; background-color:#f6f6f6; vertical-align:middle; min-height:25px; border-top:1px solid #e0e0e0;
  border-bottom:1px solid #b8babd">
         <SharePoint:AspMenu
           ID="TopNavigationMenuV4"
           Runat="server"
           EnableViewState="false"
           DataSourceID="topSiteMap"
           AccessKey="<%$Resources:wss,navigation_accesskey%>"
           UseSimpleRendering="true"
           UseSeparateCss="false"
           Orientation="Horizontal"
           StaticDisplayLevels="2"
           MaximumDynamicDisplayLevels="1"
           SkipLinkText=""
           CssClass="s4-tn"/>
         <SharePoint:DelegateControl runat="server" ControlId="TopNavigationDataSource" Id="topNavigationDelegate">
          <Template_Controls>
           <asp:SiteMapDataSource
             ShowStartingNode="False"
             SiteMapProvider="SPNavigationProvider"
             id="topSiteMap"
             runat="server"
             StartingNodeUrl="sid:1002"/>
          </Template_Controls>
         </SharePoint:DelegateControl>
     </div>
I grabbed the inline styles from corev4.css. You can change those as you please to get your desired look. Also, if you’d rather have all of the pages with minimal.master inlcude the top link, you can add the nop nav to minimal.master instead. Look at v4.master for the placeholder tags that I had to remove for insertion in the page layout. (asp:ContentPlaceHolder id="PlaceHolderTopNavBar" runat="server"> and <asp:ContentPlaceHolder id="PlaceHolderHorizontalNav" runat="server">).

Change the masterpage of the search center

Microsoft Releases SQL Server 2012 to Manufacturing March 12, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft, Server, Software, SQL.
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Microsoft this week announced that it has completed the development of SQL Server 2012, the next major release of its data platform. Code-named Denali and in development for several years, SQL Server 2012 will become broadly available next month, according to the company.

"Data is being generated faster than ever before, and organizations need a way to process and analyze all that data," says Microsoft Corporate Vice President Ted Kummert. "Whatever the type or size of data, SQL Server 2012 delivers the platform and familiar tools to manage data, generate actionable insights, and help drive business impact."

Microsoft Releases SQL Server 2012 to Manufacturing

Microsoft Download Manager – Cannot install in a Windows Server box » Everything about technology March 2, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft, Server, Software, Solutions, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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For a long time now every time I try to download something from a Microsoft site that uses the download manager I come across different error messages in Internet Explorer, the latest one being:  “An add-on for this website failed to run. Check the security settings in Internet Options for Potential Conflicts.” and it pretty much stays in a screen that looks like the following one:

If you observe the installation in another box with a different browser you will notice that the Akamai Download Manager being used by Microsoft is not working and the main reason behind that is because this ActiveX controller is coming from a non-Microsoft site. You can install it from Akamai directly from their site at: http://dlm.tools.akamai.com/dlmanager/versions/activex/dlm-activex-2.2.5.0.cab, however there is an easier and better way to address this. Go to the list of trusted sites and add the following one:

http://dlm.tools.akamai.com

Microsoft Download Manager – Cannot install in a Windows Server box » Everything about technology

Windows 8 vs. iPad: feature by feature | The Verge March 2, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Apple, BlogoSphere, iOS, Microsoft, Microsoft, Platforms & EcoSystems, Software, The Verge, Windows, Windows 8.
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ipad vs windows 8 comparison

Microsoft’s Windows 8 Consumer Preview was made available to download yesterday, giving everyone a chance to experience the company’s most revolutionary change in user interface since Windows 95. The interaction paradigm has shifted from a mouse-centric desktop to a touch-friendly, highly visual Metro style UI. The old Start orb has been retired and replaced by a Charms bar, which is brought to life with an inward swipe from the right. A swipe from the top down dismisses the app you’re in and returns you to the home screen, and the left and bottom edges also have actions associated with them. Gestures play a very significant role in Windows 8, but they’re only one aspect of a truly gargantuan list of changes……

Windows 8 vs. iPad: feature by feature | The Verge

Disappointing review they really didn’t show off features that Windows 8 had and that the iPad didn’t. The features were ones compared to the limited iPad set. For example the author failed to point out you can easily switch to a Full Internet explorer from the Metro Internet Explorer. For a full detailed overview of Windows 8 CP feature see Paul Thurott’s SuperSite for Windows, www.winsupersite.com. Many of his articles are linked here.

With Windows 8 Consumer Preview, Microsoft Silences the Critics March 2, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in BlogoSphere, Microsoft, Paul Thurrott, Software, Windows 8.
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Suddenly, you can see it happening: A future in which Microsoft melds the traditional Windows desktop with the highly mobile and highly connected devices that are just now exploding isn’t just possible. It’s a sure thing.

Microsoft on Wednesday unleashed its nearly feature-complete Windows 8 Consumer Preview to the public. This new pre-release milestone, called the Beta internally, is one of just a handful of public releases the company plans before delivering the final version of the OS in an expected Q4 2012 timeframe. But it’s already got the Internet buzzing.

"Get psyched," commentator and professional Apple promoter David Pogue wrote from his column at the New York Times. "With Windows 8, Microsoft has sweated the details, embraced beauty and simplicity, and created something new and delightful." 

"A Silicon Valley startup called Lytro is shipping a camera this week that actually lets you focus or refocus your pictures on a computer after you take them," commentator and professional Apple promoter Walt Mossberg wrote from his equally lofty perch at the Wall Street Journal.

Wait, what?

OK, so Mr. Mossberg hasn’t opined on Windows 8 yet, but then why would he with other such exciting topics to discuss this week? The point, however, is simple: Even Microsoft’s biggest critics—and Apple’s biggest public backers—love Windows 8. Well, assuming they give it the time of day, that is.

"We really are on the threshold of a whole new era of personal computing,
USA Today‘s more moderate Ed Baig noted in his own review. "I’m impressed by what I see."

So am I, Ed. So am I…….

With Windows 8 Consumer Preview, Microsoft Silences the Critics