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SharePoint Training Team Blog: SharePoint 2010 Local Website Access – Loopback Fix May 1, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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Cause
Windows Server 2003 SP1 introduced a loopback security check. This feature is also present in Windows Server 2008 R2.
The feature prevents access to a web application using a fully qualified domain name (FQDN) if an attempt to access it takes place from a machine that hosts that application. The end result is a 401.1 Access Denied from the web server and a logon failure in the event log.
Another problem is that the search crawler failing
Resolution

Apply the fix mentioned in http://support.microsoft.com/kb/896861 only for DEV environments.
Method 2: Disable the loopback check
To set the DisableLoopbackCheck registry key, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.
  2. In Registry Editor, locate and then click the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa
  3. Right-click Lsa, point to New, and then click DWORD Value.
  4. Type DisableLoopbackCheck, and then press ENTER.
  5. Right-click DisableLoopbackCheck, and then click Modify.
  6. In the Value data box, type 1, and then click OK.
  7. Quit Registry Editor, and then restart your computer.

SharePoint Training Team Blog: SharePoint 2010 Local Website Access – Loopback Fix

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Remotely Managing Windows 2008 Server Core Settings through MMC Snap-ins April 25, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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Step #1: Enable remote management from any MMC snap-in through the firewall

  1. To enable remote management from any MMC snap-in, type the following:
    netsh advfirewall firewall set rule group="Remote Administration" new enable=yes

    You can always run the following command in order to disable this option:

    netsh advfirewall firewall set rule group="Remote Administration" new enable=no

If you’re performed the tasks listed in the "Remotely Managing Windows 2008 Server Core Firewall" article, then you will be able to enable the Remote Administration rule from a remote computer, by opening the Windows Firewall snap-in for the Server Core machine.

Remotely Managing Windows 2008 Server Core Settings through MMC Snap-ins

How to use unattended mode to install and remove Active Directory Domain Services on Windows Server 2008-based domain controllers April 25, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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This article describes the syntax that you use to build answer files to perform unattended installations of Active Directory Domain Services on Windows Server 2008-based domain controllers. You can also use the answer files to remove AD DS in unattended mode.

How to use unattended mode to install and remove Active Directory Domain Services on Windows Server 2008-based domain controllers

What Is IPSec?: Security Policy; Security Services April 25, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft KBs, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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Internet Protocol security (IPSec) is a framework of open standards for helping to ensure private, secure communications over Internet Protocol (IP) networks through the use of cryptographic security services. IPSec supports network-level data integrity, data confidentiality, data origin authentication, and replay protection. Because IPSec is integrated at the Internet layer (layer 3), it provides security for almost all protocols in the TCP/IP suite, and because IPSec is applied transparently to applications, there is no need to configure separate security for each application that uses TCP/IP.

IPSec helps provide defense-in-depth against:

  • Network-based attacks from untrusted computers, attacks that can result in the denial-of-service of applications, services, or the network
  • Data corruption
  • Data theft
  • User-credential theft
  • Administrative control of servers, other computers, and the network.

What Is IPSec?: Security Policy; Security Services

Installing a server role on a server running a Server Core installation of Windows Server 2008 R2: Overview April 25, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft KBs, Solutions, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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Installing a server role on a server running a Server Core installation of Windows Server 2008 R2: Overview

After the Server Core installation is complete and the server is configured, you can install one or more server roles. The Server Core installation of Windows Server 2008 R2 supports the following server roles:

  • Active Directory Certificate Services
  • Active Directory Domain Services
  • Active Directory Lightweight Directory Services (AD LDS)
  • DHCP Server
  • DNS Server
  • File Services (including File Server Resource Manager)
  • Hyper-V
  • Streaming Media Services
  • Print and Document Services
  • Web Server (including a subset of ASP.NET)

Installing a server role on a server running a Server Core installation of Windows Server 2008 R2: Overview

Authorizing a DHCP server using Netsh April 24, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Solutions, Troubleshooting & Knowledge Bases.
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You can use the Netsh command to authorize a DHCP server from the command line.

You can use the Netsh command to authorize a DHCP server from the command line. In an Active Directory environment, you must first authorize your DHCP server before it can lease addresses to clients.

For example, to authorize a DHCP server named NYC-DHCP-01 in the CONTOSO domain and which has IP address 10.10.20.51, type the following command:

netsh dhcp add server NYC-DHCP-01.contoso.com 10.10.20.51

To verify the result, type this command:

netsh dhcp show server

If you decide later to remove the server from your network, you can unauthorized it by typing:

netsh dhcp delete server NYC-DHCP-01.contoso.com 10.10.20.51

Authorizing a DHCP server using Netsh

Running Windows Embedded Standard on Hyper-V – Olivier’s Blog – Site Home – MSDN Blogs April 23, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Uncategorized.
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So here is something interesting I have been doing and that I wanted to share.

I am working on some labs and I needed to have a Windows Embedded Standard image running in a Virtual machine on top of Hyper-V. I felt like I would have a hard time doing this but at the end of the day it was really easy!

imageSo here are the 3 special steps (sure those who have kids watching Special Agent OSO know  what I am talking about with the 3 special steps :-))

Step 1: Create a VHD

First of all I created a new VHD and for this I used this amazing feature of Windows 7 (I am running the Release Candidate on which, by the way, all the Windows Embedded tools, both for CE and WES, are running perfectly well) that enables you to create, mount and boot from VHD files. So it was as easy as opening the Disk Management tool of Windows 7, going to menu Action|Create VHD.

image I had to indicate a location for the VHD file, a size, and whether the size is fixed or dynamic.

image At this point the VHD was mounted

image

image

Next step consisted in initializing the disk (right click on the Disk name in the disk manager):

image

image

Once the disk was initialized I could create a new Simple Volume (right click on the disk in disk manager) and format it as I would have done for any other usual hard disk partition. As I wanted to boot an OS from it, I activated the volume.

At this point I had a new volume on my Windows 7 machine ready to host the Windows Embedded Standard OS.

Step 2: Prepare a WES 2009 image.

So 2 options here when you want to build a WES 2009 image for a specific target. First one is to directly go into Target Designer and Component Designer and grab the right components (you can leverage test & dev macro components), and second option is to analyze the target running the target analyzer tool that is provided within Windows Embedded Studio and that runs on Windows, DOS, WinPE. Target Analyzer creates an xml file that lists all the hardware detected on the target which can then be imported into Target Designer in order to select the exact set of drivers required for the target. In my case I went for the first solution and put some components in my OS configuration along with the Virtual PC 2007 Helper macro (this one is usually used to prepare a WES image for Virtual PC 2007 but it works fine for Hyper-V too ;-)).

clip_image002

I checked the dependencies, corrected the few errors, and built the image.

Step 3: deploy the image to Hyper-V.

At this point I had a vhd mounted in my Windows 7 file system (Step 1) and a WES 2009 image in my C:\Windows Embedded Images folder (step 2). I copied the image files into the VHD that is seen as a volume in the file system. Then I detached the VHD in the disk manager of Windows 7:

image

I then copied the .VHD file to my Hyper-V server, created a new VM, pointed to the new .VHD file and started the virtual machine: after fba, I got my image up and running on Hyper-V

clip_image002[5]

Running Windows Embedded Standard on Hyper-V – Olivier’s Blog – Site Home – MSDN Blogs

IT Blog: How to make Windows XP as a Router (IP Forwarding) April 23, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft, Platforms & EcoSystems, Windows.
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Enabling IP forwarding using Windows XP Professional will make it as a router. As an example, let say you have 7 computers and 2 network switches, and need to create 2 networks that can access Internet, so how to do it? Some more information, one of the computers is equipped with 3 network cards and one of the network cards is connected to cable/DSL modem to access Internet, so this computer will act as a router:

XP Router Network

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetServicesTcpipParameters
Right click IPEnableRouter registry object, and click Modify.
Note: Be extra careful when you deal with registry editor, wrong editing will crash you Windows OS. so you need to backup your registry.

IPEnableRouter

3) The IPEnableRouter window will appear. Type 1 as Value data and click OK.

IP 
Forwarding

4) Close the regisrty editor and reboot the computer. After rebooting, all the computers should be able to access Internet and also share the file/printer between network A and B.

IT Blog: How to make Windows XP as a Router (IP Forwarding)

Enabling IP Routing (Windows CE .NET 4.2) April 23, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Microsoft, Platforms & EcoSystems, Windows CE.
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Enabling IP Routing

Windows CE .NET

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Routing is turned on by default only if Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) or the Bluetooth gateway configuration utility is used. You can enable IP routing manually if you do not use this component or module.

Security Note   Enabling routing can potentially compromise network security. Ensure you understand the IPv4 or IPv6 security consequences of enabling routing on the device.

To enable IPv4 routing

  1. In the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Comm\Tcpip\Parms registry key, change the IPEnableRouter value to 1 (True).

    Setting this value to 1 causes the system to route IP packets between the networks to which it is connected.

  2. Reboot the device.

To enable IPv6 routing

  1. At a command prompt, type ipv6 ifc Ifindex forwards, where Ifindex is the index number of the interface in which to enable forwarding.
  2. Press ENTER.

Enabling IP Routing (Windows CE .NET 4.2)

Adobe: Illustrator – How to get Effect – Pixelate -Halftone with Vectors March 13, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Uncategorized.
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One way that will give you a clean halftone pattern using vector objects:
1. Draw a circle;  2. Copy the circle and drag the copy to where the top anchor of the copy aligns with the right anchor of the original;  3. Select both, copy, and align so the top anchor of the copy aligns with the bottom anchor of the original:

4. Repeat the copying/pasting until you have a nice little row of circles;  5. Select the entire row, and make a copy waaaay to the right:

6. Select all, give it all a black fill, remove the stroke;  7. Select the right row, and hit Ctrl-Alt-Shift-D (Object>Transform>Transform Each) and set the scale for 2% vertical and 2% horizontal (Hard to see them lil specks for a moment…):

8. Select the left row of big circles, group them;  9. Select the right row of small specks, group them too;  10.  Select all, make a blend:

Adjust as needed.  You’ll notice that if you drag the right row to the right, more rows will blend in.

Adobe: Illustrator – How to get Effect>Pixelate>Halftone Colour in one color