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Microsoft to reveal more Windows 8 Enterprise details at CeBIT conference next week | The Verge March 2, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in BlogoSphere, Microsoft, Platforms & EcoSystems, The Verge, Windows.
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By Dieter Bohnon February 29, 2012 11:00 am

Windows 8 Enterprise

During today’s Windows 8 keynote, Microsoft showed off a previously-known Enterprise features like Windows To Go, which allows a computer to boot into Windows 8 off of a USB stick. Microsoft also demoed "Storage Spaces," which allows a Windows 8 machine to act as a hard drive array, providing simple, massive storage to any computer on the network. It seems as though there’s yet more to Windows 8 Enterprise that the company has yet to reveal, but more will be revealed next week at the CeBIT conference in Hanover. The conference begins on March 6th and The Verge will be there to bring you all the details from the next Windows 8 event.

Microsoft also emphasized that enterprise users will benefit from the fact that Windows 8 offers the same experience on all manner of devices, from very small to very large and powerful. It’s a theme that the company hit on consistently throughout the entire keynote, and very likely going to be one of the big talking points when it comes time to directly compete with Apple’s iPad ecosystem.

Read More…Microsoft to reveal more Windows 8 Enterprise details at CeBIT conference next week | The Verge

That’s a great diagram showing how the ecosystem has reach in many spaces.

WinInfo Short Takes: March 2, 2012 March 2, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in Apple, BlogoSphere, Google, Paul Thurrott, Platforms & EcoSystems.
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An often irreverent look at this week’s other news, including Microsoft’s amazingly successful launch of the Windows 8 Consumer Preview, Windows Azure falls for the oldest trick in the book, Google’s privacy policy change goes live and the world moves on, AT&T starts throttling more people, OnLive Desktop heads to Android, iPhone and Android lets apps steal your photos, and US users admire Apple and Google because they don’t know what these companies are really doing.

News Flash: People are Ignorant When it Comes to Love

And speaking of Apple and Google, these two wildly out of control corporations just topped Fortune’s list of the most admired companies in the United States, proving once again that the public has absolutely no idea what Apple and Google are really doing. Unbelievable.

Read More….WinInfo Short Takes: March 2, 2012

I find it’s amazing how the general person says Apple or Google is the best and most of them can’t even give you an exact reason why. I might be a Microsoft Partner, but I’m not a total fan boy. They make plenty their own mistakes over the years, but at least they take responsibility.

 

With Windows 8 Consumer Preview, Microsoft Silences the Critics March 2, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in BlogoSphere, Microsoft, Paul Thurrott, Software, Windows 8.
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Suddenly, you can see it happening: A future in which Microsoft melds the traditional Windows desktop with the highly mobile and highly connected devices that are just now exploding isn’t just possible. It’s a sure thing.

Microsoft on Wednesday unleashed its nearly feature-complete Windows 8 Consumer Preview to the public. This new pre-release milestone, called the Beta internally, is one of just a handful of public releases the company plans before delivering the final version of the OS in an expected Q4 2012 timeframe. But it’s already got the Internet buzzing.

"Get psyched," commentator and professional Apple promoter David Pogue wrote from his column at the New York Times. "With Windows 8, Microsoft has sweated the details, embraced beauty and simplicity, and created something new and delightful." 

"A Silicon Valley startup called Lytro is shipping a camera this week that actually lets you focus or refocus your pictures on a computer after you take them," commentator and professional Apple promoter Walt Mossberg wrote from his equally lofty perch at the Wall Street Journal.

Wait, what?

OK, so Mr. Mossberg hasn’t opined on Windows 8 yet, but then why would he with other such exciting topics to discuss this week? The point, however, is simple: Even Microsoft’s biggest critics—and Apple’s biggest public backers—love Windows 8. Well, assuming they give it the time of day, that is.

"We really are on the threshold of a whole new era of personal computing,
USA Today‘s more moderate Ed Baig noted in his own review. "I’m impressed by what I see."

So am I, Ed. So am I…….

With Windows 8 Consumer Preview, Microsoft Silences the Critics

iOS loophole gives developers access to photos, sources say a fix is coming | The Verge February 29, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in News and politics, Privacy, Security.
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iOS loophole gives developers access to photos, sources say a fix is coming | The Verge

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Another day, another iOS security concern. Today’s confidence-defeating news comes from Nick Bilton at the New York Times. Bilton writes at the paper’s Bits blog that a loophole has been discovered in iOS which allows third-party developers access to your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch’s photo and video location data… as well as the actual photos and videos themselves. It appears that if an app asks for photo location data on your device (and you approve the request for permission), that application will also be able to slurp down the photos and videos stored on your phone without any further notification. The Times report mirrors an earlier story from 9to5 Mac which detailed security issues on the platform.

We reached out to Apple about the issue, but the company declined to comment.

 

This story has clear echoes of that controversy, which came to light when a developer discovered that the app Path was downloading all of your device’s contact information to the company’s servers. In a follow-up report, we discovered that Path wasn’t the only app grabbing your info.