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Tiny $35 Raspberry Pi computer causes big stir on launch day – CNN.com March 2, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in *New Products, CNN, News and politics.
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By Nick Thompson, CNN

updated 8:26 AM EST, Fri March 2, 2012 |

<br/>The $35 credit card-sized Raspberry Pi computer sold out within hours of its debut Wednesday.

(CNN) — The debut of the tiny $35 Raspberry Pi computer crashed its distributors’ websites on the way to selling out within hours of launch.

Looking like little more than a credit card-sized chip of circuit board, the powerful, fully-programmable PC can plug into any TV and can power 3D graphics and Blu-ray video playback.

Its British-based designers at the Raspberry Pi Foundation hope the computer, which has been in the works for six years, will spark new interest in programming among children.

"The primary goal was to build a low cost computer that every child could own, and one where programming was the natural thing to do with it," said co-founder Robert Mullins.

Read Moreā€¦Tiny $35 Raspberry Pi computer causes big stir on launch day – CNN.com

iOS loophole gives developers access to photos, sources say a fix is coming | The Verge February 29, 2012

Posted by John Ruby in News and politics, Privacy, Security.
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iOS loophole gives developers access to photos, sources say a fix is coming | The Verge

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Another day, another iOS security concern. Today’s confidence-defeating news comes from Nick Bilton at the New York Times. Bilton writes at the paper’s Bits blog that a loophole has been discovered in iOS which allows third-party developers access to your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch’s photo and video location data… as well as the actual photos and videos themselves. It appears that if an app asks for photo location data on your device (and you approve the request for permission), that application will also be able to slurp down the photos and videos stored on your phone without any further notification. The Times report mirrors an earlier story from 9to5 Mac which detailed security issues on the platform.

We reached out to Apple about the issue, but the company declined to comment.

 

This story has clear echoes of that controversy, which came to light when a developer discovered that the app Path was downloading all of your device’s contact information to the company’s servers. In a follow-up report, we discovered that Path wasn’t the only app grabbing your info.